New Faculty Publications: A Look at Victimization

Leah Daigle, Associate Professor in the Criminal Justice department, has two recent publications in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence.  Published in the April 2014 issue, Trajectories of Recurring Victimization Among People With Major Mental Disorders,  “examines the extent of recurring victimization among people with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) Axis I mental disorders and trajectories of recurring violent victimization (n = 262), across four waves of data collected during a 1-year longitudinal study…. Results suggest that recurring violent victimization is not uncommon among mentally disordered victims of violence, with 64% of victims experiencing a recurring victimization at a later point in time.” – From the abstract

From January 2014, Sex-role identification and violent victimization: gender differences in the role of masculinity, “…examines sex-role identification and its relationship to violent victimization. The findings suggest that masculinity increases the risk of violent victimization for males, but does not for females. Other differences in risk factors across gender were also found. These findings indicate that masculinity is an important construct in understanding the complexity of why some persons are violently victimized and others are not.” -From the abstract

Professor Daigle’s other research interests include the development and continuation of offending over time and gender differences in the antecedents to and consequences of criminal victimization and participation across the life-course.

Complete Citations:

Daigle, Leah E, and Sadie J Mummert. “Sex-role identification and violent victimization: gender differences in the role of masculinity.” Journal Of Interpersonal Violence 29, no. 2 (January 2014): 255-278.

Teasdale, Brent, Daigle, Leah E. and Ballard, Ellen. 2014. “Trajectories of Recurring Victimization Among People With Major Mental Disorders.” Journal Of Interpersonal Violence 29, no. 6: 987-1005.

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