Meet a Librarian: La Loria Konata

Who is La Loria?

La Loria is the librarian for Criminal Justice, Economics, Public Management & Policy, and Social Work.  She was born and raised in Cleveland, Mississippi and moved to Atlanta in 1992.  La Loria has a B.A. in Political Science and Pre-Law from Tougaloo College, an M.P.A (Master of Public Administration) from Georgia State University, an M.L.S. (Master of Library Science) from Clark Atlanta University, and she’s about to finish a Juris Master in Intellectual Property from Emory School of Law.

Why librarianship?

La Loria was working fulltime at the GSU Library while pursuing her M.P.A. and realized that research “made sense” after learning the ins and outs of the library.  Additionally, her mom went to college when La Loria was growing up and La Loria sometimes helped her with her research.  La Loria liked the work she was doing in the library and wanted to be able to help other students with research, particularly non-traditional students who were a large part of the population of GSU at that time.  La Loria didn’t always want to be a librarian, though.  Growing up, she wanted to be a lawyer like Perry Mason!

What does La Loria do when she’s not at work (or studying)?

La Loria is the author of LaKo’s Lessons from Sports, a blog about work and life lessons from the world of sports.  La Loria also loves music and movies.  Her favorite bands are Earth, Wind & Fire and Parliament Funkadelic.  Shalamar was the first concert she ever attended and she was heartbroken when the band broke up.

La Loria’s favorite movies are Cleopatra Jones, because she was the first Black female superhero, A Piece of the Action (a Black To Sir with Love), Back to the Future, because the idea of going back to correct mistakes of the past is appealing, and Last Holiday (with Queen Latifah) for its message to live in the moment and don’t wait until you’re dying to fulfill your bucket list.

A few other things you might not know about La Loria:

  • She played the snare drum and bells in high school marching band.
  • She loves sports, especially football.
  • She ran the Peachtree Road Race in 2014.

 

 

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Data in the ATL, with Arthi Rao – Nov. 10 @ 11:00

Join us this Friday, Nov. 10 from 11:00-12:30, for the next in our series of Data in the ATL talks sponsored by Georgia State University Library, which connect the university community with prominent members of the Atlanta data community. Invited speakers show the importance of data science in making informed decisions in their chosen vocations and how they use data analysis and expertise in their daily work to create a better Atlanta and world.

Location: CURVE, Georgia State University Library, 2nd floor of Library South, 103 Decatur Street SE, Atlanta, GA 30303

Featured Speaker

Arthi RaoArthi Rao, American Cancer Society

As Senior Research Scientist for Geospatial Research within the Statistics and Evaluation Center at the American Cancer Society, Arthi leads research projects in understanding community-level determinants of access to cancer treatment, cancer screening, and identifying vulnerable communities for public health interventions. She performs all aspects of geospatial analytics including statistical analysis, modeling, Python scripting, mapping and tool development for initiatives across ACS.

Register online. Seating is limited.

Data in the ATL logo

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Leisure Reading in the GSU Libraries

Looking for a good book to read unrelated to your research or coursework? In response to requests from students and a renewed interest in recreational reading, the GSU libraries have introduced a leisure reading section, called the Browsing Collection.

What books are in the Browsing Collection? Current and recent bestsellers, mystery, suspense, historical fiction, and science-fiction novels, plus a wide selection of nonfiction titles on current events, history, sports, health and wellness, self-help, humor, and more!

The collection is located on the 2nd floor of Library North at the Atlanta Campus and will be available at all of the Perimeter College libraries as well.

GSU students, faculty, and staff may checkout books from the collection for a period of 28 days. Due to their high demand, the titles may not be renewed.

The Browsing Collection helps the GSU Libraries meet increasing student demand for leisure reading materials to supplement our academic collections. The collection will be updated on a regular basis, so check back often for new titles.

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Online library workshops for November

Student in the library using a laptop wearing headphones

Check out our upcoming online workshops for November! These are free of charge and open to all GSU students, faculty and staff.

Literature Research Basics

Learn the basics of finding online information resources about literature topics including author biographies, literary criticism/analysis, and literature movements. Includes recommend databases and search tips specific to literature topics. This webinar is open to all GSU students, faculty, and staff, although the content is focused on the research needs of freshmen and sophomore students.

Date:Wednesday, November 1, 2017
Time:2:00pm – 3:00pm

Zotero

Get started with Zotero, the powerful citation application that allows you to save references, create bibliographies automatically, and build a personal database of the sources you use. Zotero is free, librarian-approved and easy to use.

Date:Thursday, November 16, 2017
Time:11:00am – 12:00pm

These are online workshops held via WebEx conference — you’ll need a computer with speakers or headphones. Register at the links above, and check with the workshop instructors if you have any questions.

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New Digital Collection: Georgia Perimeter College Collection

 

Cover of Perimeter College’s 1994-1995 course catalog

Page from a 1972 issue of The Open Door, Perimeter’s student newspaper

Georgia Perimeter College materials are now available online! The digital collection includes yearbooks, catalogs, and student newspapers from the 1960s to the 2010s. Perimeter College was founded by the DeKalb County Board of Education as DeKalb College in 1958 and offered its first classes in Clarkston, Georgia, in 1964. Its service area grew as new campuses opened and students came to the college from throughout the metro Atlanta area. In 1972, DeKalb College was renamed DeKalb Community College, later reverting back to DeKalb College when the institution became a part of the University System of Georgia in 1986. In 1997, DeKalb College was renamed Georgia Perimeter College, a two-year associate degree-granting unit of the University System of Georgia. On January 6, 2016, Georgia Perimeter College became a unit of Georgia State University. Users can browse the collection by decade, date, format, or by the name of the institution at the time each item was published.

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Posted in Digital Collections, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, Primary Resources, Special Collections & Archives, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Chasing Clues: Identifying the First Homecoming

Determining when Homecoming began as a named “tradition” at Georgia State is not an easy task. Sources disagree, are unclear, and sometimes are mistaken.

The Technite student newspaper (a name reflecting our origin as Georgia Tech’s Evening School of Commerce) highlights a “Sixth Annual Dance” and banquet in its December 1926 issue. That could date the first annual banquet and dance to 1921. Annual banquets were also held by business clubs at Georgia Tech at least by 1917, and the Evening School junior class organized annual banquets for the seniors. The first Evening School class on the downtown campus graduated in 1916. So the origins of Homecoming, though not an event called “Homecoming,” seem to date back to 1916.

When Georgia State reached its half-century anniversary, a Faculty Fiftieth Anniversary Committee was formed. The 1964 Rampway yearbook shows committee members and provides a retrospective on college activities, describing the annual banquets as “held since 1916, but with more formality after 1928.” The “first Homecoming,” according to this source, “was held in the Georgia Baptist church dining hall” and alumni were invited. Aha—a concrete clue!

Working carefully through existing copies of the Technite and its successor, the Evening Signal, I was able to draft a chart with date and location of the annual banquet and dance.

November 21, 1930, at Georgia Tech’s Dining Hall

[1931 and 1932—no sources, no information]

November 29, 1933, at Davison’s Tea Room

October 15, 1934, at Tabernacle Baptist Church [November 1934 Technite editorial wants to “replace Annual Fall Banquet” with “Homecoming Day”]

[February 1935 at Shrine Mosque, since December 1934 Technite refers to “Home Coming Banquet to be Held in February;” and 9 December 1935 Evening Signal says “Last year at Shrine Mosque”]

February 9, 1936 but later revised as February 19, 1936, at Atlanta Athletic Club [per Evening Signal 9 December 1935 and 29 January 1936: “Homecoming to Be February 19th” and “1936 Annual Homecoming”]

November 24, 1936, at Shrine Mosque [Evening Signal of 2 November and 20 November 1936 refer to “Homecoming” and “Annual Home-coming Banquet and Dance”]

The most significant clue? The Evening Signal of 7 December 1936 refers to the November 24, 1936, event as the Evening School’s “fourth annual Homecoming.” Bingo! In retrospect, that would make the October 1934 banquet the first Homecoming (although it wasn’t called “Homecoming” in October 1934).

But was there any confirmation of this statement? In checking Merl Reed’s book, Educating the Urban New South: The Rise of Georgia State University, 1913-1969, as well as his working papers and footnotes, I noticed that he had relied almost exclusively on student publications to discuss student activities. But there was one intriguing exception: a reference to President George Sparks’s records, which we have in University Archives. Being curious I went to look, and found the flyer pictured above.

What a fascinating discovery! Robert Johnson, a man little known in current university annals, was a significant and beloved donor to the young school during the Great Depression. He was the chief fundraiser for the first building (completed in 1931) that became a permanent home for the burgeoning Evening School. The building was located at 126 Luckie Street NW, adjacent to the Baptist Tabernacle (venue for the event later known as the first homecoming). In 1936, Johnson personally paid off the remaining debt on the building. He was to be honored at the “Fourth Annual Homecoming” but was unable to attend due to illness. The next year, sixteen days after the “Fifth Annual Homecoming” in December 1937, he died at 53 years old.

Interested in more about the history of homecoming at Georgia State? See the article in the Fall 2017 issue of Georgia State University Magazine, or look for issues of the student newspaper, yearbooks, and photos available in the Library’s Digital Collections.

Archives and Library Sources:

  1. Technite, December 1, 1926
  2. Rampway, 1964, pp. 12 and 16
  3. Technite, November 17, 1930 and December 15, 1930
  4. Evening Signal, October 2, 1933; November 6, 1933; December 11, 1933
  5. Evening Signal, November 7, 1934; December 10, 1934
  6. Evening Signal, December 10, 1934
  7. Evening Signal, December 9, 1935; January 29, 1936; February 27, 1936
  8. Evening Signal, October 5, 1936; October 19, 1936; November 2, 1936; November 20, 1936; December 7, 1936
  9. Merl Reed Papers, G2009-58
  10. Merl Reed, Educating the Urban New South: Atlanta and the Rise of Georgia State University, 1913-1969. Macon, GA:  Mercer University Press, 2009.  Chapters 2, 8, and 9.
  11. President George Sparks Records, Box 11, Folder 151.

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Posted in Digital Collections, Education, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, History, Primary Resources, Special Collections & Archives | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

University Library Participates in National Day on Writing

GSU student, Destiny Hives, creates a poem.

National Day on Writing (NDW), founded by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) was first held on October 20, 2009 and has since then been celebrated every year on that date.  The day was established to celebrate the variety and importance of writing in our lives, from text messages and emails–to scholarly articles and books, and to eliminate stigmas surrounding writing–that it must follow certain rules and is only done in the classroom.  In both 2009 and 2010, NDW was officially recognized by U.S. Senate resolutions.

A poem by GSU student, Chizoba Mbq.

Since 2014, the Writing Studio and the Graduate English Association at Georgia State University have collaborated with other literacy-focused organizations on campus, including University Library, to hold a GSU National Day on Writing.  The 2017 celebration was held in Library Plaza on the Atltanta campus on Wednesday, October 18.  During the celebration, campus organizations were invited to host creative and fun activities to engage students and the university community in the act of writing.

Kasey Abel reads her poem to Fatih Sahinkoyosi.

Poems created by GSU students for NDW.

A poem created by a student for NDW.

University Library hosted a magnetic poetry station, where students were invited to express themselves creatively.  Over 60 students stopped by and created poems, some of which are shown here.  Two students even bonded over their love of poetry when one read her poem to the other.

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Data in the ATL, with Landon Reed – Oct. 20 @ 11:00

Join us Friday, Oct. 20 from 11:00-12:30, for the next in our series of Data in the ATL talks sponsored by Georgia State University Library, which connect the University community with prominent members of the Atlanta data community. Invited speakers show the importance of data science in making informed decisions in their chosen vocations and how they use data analysis and expertise in their daily work to create a better Atlanta and world.

Location: CURVE, Georgia State University Library, 2nd floor of Library South, 103 Decatur Street SE, Atlanta, GA 30303

Featured Speaker

Landon ReedLandon Reed, Project Lead, Data Tools at Conveyal

Conveyal is a start-up transportation and land-use analysis consultancy based in Washington, D.C., with offices in Atlanta, Paris, Portland, and New York City. At Conveyal, Landon is working to build open source, next generation tools for sustainable transportation, with particular focus on multimodal routing and trip planning, transportation network analysis, and data management and visualization.

Register online. Seating is limited.

 

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Meet A Librarian: Mandy Swygart-Hobaugh

Who is Mandy? 

Mandy is the librarian for Sociology and Data Services as well as the Team Leader for Research Data Services on the Atlanta campus. She was born and raised in Monon, Indiana. Before coming to GSU, she lived in Iowa, Kansas, and then Wisconsin–clearly a mid-westerner. Before deciding to become a librarian, Mandy says she had the “major of the month.” Apparently she changed her major every month from math, musical theater, and others before pursuing her PhD in Sociology and Master’s in Library Science.

     Musicology?

Mandy plays a mean accordion and is a member of the library’s big band. The first concert that she saw live was The Bangles. It was actually the group Chicago, but she doesn’t want you to know that since the lead singer, Peter Cetera, was no longer part of the group. Mandy enjoys a broad range of musical genres such as jazz from the 1920s to punk rock and everything in between. One of her favorite songs is “Closer to Fine” by the Indigo Girls, because of these lyrics which Mandy uses to navigate life:                                         

There’s more than one answer to these questions
Pointing me in a crooked line
And the less I seek my source for some definitive
The closer I am to fine

Here are a few other things you may not know about Mandy:

  • Favorite cheese? Smoked Gouda
  • Favorite holiday? Halloween – Mandy hopes to go as a Punk Rocker this year – her go-to costume.
  • Favorite Comic Book Hero? Wonder Woman
  • Her Superpower? The ability to talk nonstop like her Grandma Maxine.
  • Coffee or Tea? Coffee, preferably iced with mocha or other sugary goodness.
  • Reading Now/Next? White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America by Nancy Isenberg.
  • Interesting tidbit? In 2013, Mandy auditioned for the Wheel of Fortune game show. Her profile picture (above) is the photo she submitted for the audition.

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Posted in Data Services, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, General News, Gerontology, Services, Sociology | 6 Comments

Upcoming Workshop: Teaching with Primary Sources: Comic Books and Context

cover, Sorcery comic book, 1974Kevin Fleming, Popular Music and Culture Archivist, and Jill Anderson, History/African-American Studies/Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Librarian, are offering a “Teaching with Primary Sources: Comic Books and Context” workshop for faculty and graduate students. This workshop will be held on Wednesday, October 25, from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m, and will take place in the Colloquium Room, Library South 8, on the downtown Atlanta campus.

In this hands-on workshop, attendees will be the “students” for several exercises utilizing comic books from Special Collections & Archives’ Popular Culture Literature Collection and other related primary sources. The exercise will be followed by discussion and brainstorming on other creative ways to use these resources for teaching.

This workshop is a follow-up to our Spring 2017 workshop “Teaching with Primary Sources: Popular Culture and Pulp,” but will incorporate new activity, so is also a stand-alone workshop. Prior attendance at our spring workshop is not at all necessary. We invite you to attend as our “students”!

Register for the workshop here.

Want to know more? Contact Jill Anderson or Kevin Fleming with questions.

Image: Red Circle Sorcery No. 9, Series V: Comic Books, Popular Culture Literature Collection, M225, Popular Music and Culture Collection, Special Collections and Archives Department, Georgia State University, Atlanta.

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Posted in African American Studies, Anthropology, Communication, Education, English, Film & Media, For Faculty, History, Instruction, Journalism, Middle & Secondary Education, Primary Resources, Psychology, Public Health, Sociology, Special Collections & Archives, Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment