Doctoral student Lashonda Slaughter-Wilson uses the Dissertation Library Travel award to study a 16th century manuscript held in Washington D.C.

Doctoral student Lashonda Slaughter-Wilson researches a 16th century guide on witchcraft

Lashonda Slaughter-Wilson, a Ph.D. ABD (all but dissertation) Candidate in the Department of History at Georgia State University, was awarded with Georgia State University’s Dissertation Library Travel Award.

The award grants doctoral students with financial assistance to support their research travel. With this award, Slaughter-Wilson travelled to Washington D.C. to visit the Folger Shakespeare Library, where she spent four days conducting research for her dissertation.

Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C where Slaughter-Wilson conduced her research; the inlays are famous scenes from Shakespeare plays

Slaughter-Wilson’s dissertation focuses on the book Daemonologie, a guide on hunting witches written by King James VI in the 1500s. She was driven to this topic because of her interest in King James VI and how his beliefs on witchcraft influenced Scottish and English society. Slaughter-Wilson hopes the takeaway from her dissertation is that words carry weight, especially when the words come from an authoritative person, and can shift important aspects of a society, such as laws and religion.

Scribal manuscript copy of King James VI of Scotland’s publication titles Daemonologie

Slaughter-Wilson spent four days researching the text in the Folger Shakespeare Library’s Reading Room,. Her favorite part of the trip was touching the Daemonologie manuscript and reading all of King James’ marginalia, handwritten notes in the margin that appear throughout the text.

Her previous research trips included visiting archives in England and Scotland, where she found original printed copies of Daemonologie and other archival records related to witch hunts. It was there that she learned the Folger Shakespeare Library holds the scribal manuscript of Daemonologie. When Slaughter-Wilson returned home from Europe, she received an email about the dissertation library travel award from her department. She applied for the award in hopes of visiting Washington D.C. to access Daemonologie.

A handwritten note by King James VI pointing out changes to the scribal text

Slaughter-Wilson’s advice for students who are thinking of applying for the dissertation library travel award is to just do it. When she applied for this award, she did not think she would get it. Not only did Slaughter-Wilson receive the award, but she was also able to pay for nearly the entire trip with the award money. She also recommends that students be clear about their research and show their passion for the topic.

To apply for the Dissertation Library Travel Award, visit https://graduate.gsu.edu/dissertation-library-travel-awards/. Award students will receive $500 for domestic travel and $1,000 for international travel.

The Dissertation Travel Award is only possible through the support of library donors. To support scholars like Lashonda, give to the Library Research Award Fund (020061).

Article written in collaboration with Tess Havash

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Come do Data After Dark with us!

The Library’s Research Data Services Team offers the majority of our workshops during daytime hours. But we occasionally get feedback like the following:

“I work full-time during the day and can only come to campus after I get off work — do you ever have workshops at night?”

“My classes during the day conflict with when you have your workshops — do you have any at night?”

Since we try to meet all of our campus researchers’ needs to our best ability, we now offer workshops in the evenings. They begin at either 6:30pm or 7:00pm to give people time to grab some dinner, hop in their chosen transit mode, and get through Atlanta traffic. So…

Come do Data After Dark with us!

Data After Dark workshops, Fall 2019

The calendar postings with dates, times, and details are linked below.

STATA After Dark

Stata 1: Introduction to Stata
Stata 2: Basic Data Analysis
Stata 3: Advanced Data Analysis
NETWORKS After Dark

Networks 1: General Overview of Social Networks and Social Network Analysis
Networks 2: Analyzing Sociocentric Networks with Stata
Networks 3: Social Network Instrument Development and Data Collection
SURVEY DESIGN After Dark

Survey Design 1: General Overview of Survey Design
Survey Design 2: Generating and Designing Paper Surveys
Survey Design 3: Generating and Designing Online Surveys with Qualtrics
SPSS After Dark

SPSS 1: Getting Started
SPSS 2: Analyzing Data
SPSS 3: Basic Coding in SPSS
NVIVO After Dark

NVivo 1 for Windows: Getting Started
NVivo 2 for Windows: Exploring Your Data
SAS After Dark

SAS 1: Introduction to SAS
SAS 2: Data Editing and Cleaning
MIXED METHODS After Dark

Mixed Methods: General Overview of Mixed Methods Research Design
TABLEAU After Dark

Tableau 1: Getting Started with Data Visualization
Tableau 2: Data Visualization Beyond the Basics
LOGISTIC REGRESSION After Dark

Logistic Regression: Logistic Regression using Stata
MAPPING DATA After Dark

Mapping Census Data with Social Explorer
R After Dark

R 1: Introduction to R
R 2: Basic Data Analysis in R
MARKETING DATA After Dark

Marketing Data: Consumers, Products, and Brands
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Get RDS@GSU Data Certified!

The Georgia State University Library’s Research Data Services (RDS) Team offers a wide variety of workshops on data analysis tools & methods, mapping & data visualization, finding data & statistics, and survey design. This Fall 2019 semester the RDS Team is offering 66 workshops — the most offerings we’ve had in a single semester to date. We’re even offering some evening workshops this semester to better accommodate campus researchers’ needs.

Why should you attend the Research Data Services (RDS) Team’s data workshops?

Data skills — even just basic data skills — are highly valued by today’s employers — being called “the most lucrative skill[s] to have” and “the most valuable skill[s] you can learn.” So, attending our data workshops will give you a leg up once you’re out there looking for a job.

Best of all, our data workshops are all free.

You may be thinking, “So what if they’re free?” Well, we researched how much workshops on our various topics would cost out in the real-world market, and what we found may make you re-think that “so what” reaction:

  • You could expect to pay $110 on average for a 1.5-hour workshop (the typical length of our workshops).
  • You could pay as low as $61/1.5-hour workshop, or as high as $200/1.5-hour workshop.
  • So, the 66 workshops that the RDS Team is offering for *FREE* in this Fall 2019 semester equates to an average $10,890 total cost at the market price, and it could range from $6,039 to $19,800 in total cost.

In other words, our free workshops are clearly quite a bargain and something you should be taking advantage of while you can…

Need even more incentive to come to our data workshops?

Okay, how about this for an incentive:

You can get RDS@GSU Data Certified!

  • Learn about our various Research Data Services (RDS) workshops on data analysis tools/softwaredata analysis methodsdata visualization and mapping, and finding data.
  • See the Library Calendar for RDS workshops — look for the logo with the GET DATA CERTIFIED seal (see image at left).
  • Attend a minimum of five unique RDS workshops in a semester.
    • Make sure you sign-in on the paper sign-in sheet at the workshop so we can track your attendance.
    • Going forward in 2019, we will count Summer and Fall semesters together, then Spring semester on its own.
    • While you’re welcome to attend the same workshop multiple times to hone your skills, to earn the data certificate you need to attend a minimum of five *unique* workshops (i.e., if you take Stata 1 twice, it can only count once toward your five workshops — but if you take Stata 1, Stata 2, and Stata 3, those count as three workshops toward the five needed for the certification).
    • Attending a Data in the ATL talk *does not* count as a workshop toward the certificate.
  • If you’ve attended a minimum five unique RDS workshops, you’ll be invited to a ceremony where you can mingle with others committed to getting RDS@GSU Data Certified *and* receive a custom certificate signed by our Dean of Libraries and the Leader of the Research Data Services Team (see example below). 
    • All certificate awardees will also receive a PDF version of the certificate via email.

Yes, it’s that easy! And by getting RDS@GSU Data Certified, you demonstrate to potential employers that you are committed to growing the data skills that they look for in hires. Last year, we awarded 92 certificates — learn more about those 92 inaugural RDS@GSU Data Certificate awardees! And here is what some of the RDS@GSU Data Certificate awardees had to say about the experience:

The certificate is a great opportunity to become a more competitive candidate while applying for a job. The workshops were very interactive.

I thought the RDS@GSU Data Certification incentivized my participation in the RDS workshops. The workshops themselves were great and it definitely helped me brush up on prior skills and knowledge.

Certification looks amazing on resumes, I also found what was covered useful to my practice of SAS & SPSS.

It is essential for me as a student majoring in Epidemiology. I will be involved in research, and the only way to answer some of the world’s health problems is making sense out of data. I’m confident this certificate will prove useful for me in getting a job. The entire program is flexible, and the materials are very helpful in understanding the course content.

So, get RDS@GSU Data Certified! It’s free, and it’s worth it.

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David St. John hopes to propose a new way of looking at the environment through the lens of traffic.

The University Library award aided St. John’s travel to Hong Kong Island to conduct research on human trafficking for his dissertation

David St. John, a Ph.D. Candidate in English Literature at Georgia State University, was awarded a Georgia State University Dissertation Library Travel Award.

The award, which grants doctoral students with financial assistance to support their research travel, aided St. John’s travel to Hong Kong Island to conduct research on human trafficking for his dissertation. St. John’s research focuses on the concept of traffic.  He has devoted time to researching automobile traffic, drug trafficking, and human trafficking.  St. John hopes to propose a new way of looking at the environment through the lens of traffic.

Hong Kong International Airport, also known as Chek Lap Kok Airport
Hong Kong International Airport, also known as Chek Lap Kok Airport

While in Hong Kong, St. John conducted research with the University of Hong Kong, the city library, and the Po Leung Kuk Museum.

Po Leung Kuk started as a community organization in 1878 during a time when abduction and trafficking of women and children were prevalent in Hong Kong. The organization was created to rescue the kidnapped victims. “Po Leung” translates to protection of the young and the innocent and was originally called Society for the Protection of Women and Children. Today, Po Leung Kuk serves as a charitable organization, a school, and a museum.  While St. John hopes to use his research to propose a new way of looking at the environment through the lens of traffic, he is very clear on the benefit of being able to conduct this portion of his research in Hong Kong.

He says, “Being able to have knowledge of the stories of another culture or history of another culture is vital to understanding how we can live in a world that’s globalizing without trying to assimilate everybody into one big mass of people.”

Front gate of Po Leung Kuk, where St. John conducted most of his research
Front gate of Po Leung Kuk, where St. John conducted most of his research

This award has impacted St. John both professionally and personally. Professionally, St. John says Hong Kong was a wonderful place for his research, and through his extensive research there, he feels he has grown as a scholar and professional researcher. Additionally, St. John believes the award also helped his future career goals. “My research in Hong Kong directly led to the paper I presented at the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment in early July,” St. John says. “My conference paper laid the groundwork for a chapter of my dissertation.”

On a personal level, St. John says, “I feel more confident in my ability to travel and the ability to take what’s outside, what’s happening in the world and apply it to literature.”

St. John advises students who are thinking of applying for the dissertation library travel award to just go for it. He believes research trips are just as crucial to a dissertation paper as the primary texts. He says, “There’s no reason not to. I did not think I was going to get this award, but I did. So, if I can get it, you can probably get it.”

The Dissertation Travel Award is only possible through the support of library donors. To support scholars like David, give to the Library Research Award Fund (020061)

Article written in collaboration with Tess Havash

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New for you: Portable DVD players!

Here’s a fact: The Library has a vast collection of movies and television on DVD, with most titles available to borrow for up to a week at a time. We’re talking cinema classics, foreign films, indie favorites, documentaries, and more–some of which you can’t find on any streaming platform!

Here’s another fact: many students (and even many professors) don’t own DVD players nowadays.

“So,” you might be thinking, “how are us DVD-player-less folks supposed to watch all this cool stuff?” Well, the Atlanta library now has 5 portable, multi-format, region-free DVD players you can borrow that are perfect for watching all the wonderful films and programs the Library has to offer. Watch what you want, wherever you want!


Here’s what one of the new player looks like. (BTW: Finding Nemo is one of the many movies we have on DVD!)

The details: DVD players can be borrowed for up to 1 week–conveniently, the same amount of time you can borrow our DVDs–and can play discs of any format (PAL or NTSC) and any region. They all have a 4-hour rechargeable battery, a 9″ swivel screen, and A/V outputs in case you want to connect the player to a larger screen. Don’t return it late! Overdue fines are set at $5 per day.

Could borrowing DVDs from the Library become the new “Netflix and chill???” Maybe. Happy watching!

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Congrats to our RDS@GSU Data Certificate Awardees!

This Spring 2019 semester the Library’s Research Data Services (RDS) Team launched a new initiative: the RDS@GSU Data Certificate program. With 92 certificate awardees, it seems safe to say that this new program was a resounding success! We are very proud of the inaugural group of RDS@GSU Data Certificate awardees. And, because we’re all about data, we want to share some data about our awardees to highlight their accomplishment.

To earn the RDS@GSU Data Certificate: Awardees had to attend a minimum of five Research Data Services (RDS) workshops offered in the areas of data analysis tools, data analysis methods, data visualization and mapping, and finding data during the past academic year.

Our 92 RDS@GSU Data Certificate awardees attended 572 workshops in total, averaging about 6 workshops per awardee. While the majority (52, 57%) completed the required minimum of five workshops, the remaining 40 awardees attended six or more — with our “most attended workshops” awardee attending 15 workshops altogether. Quite impressive!

RDS@GSU Data Certificate awardees attended workshops across a wide variety of topics offered by the RDS Team.

GSU students were our largest awardee group, with 60 (65%) graduate students, 14 (15%) undergrads, and one postbaccalaureate. But we also had GSU staff, faculty, and even some GSU alumni thrown in the mix!

Almost all of the GSU Colleges had some representation – as did some administrative offices and the Library as well. Andrew Young School of Policy Studies had the most representation, followed by the College of Arts & Sciences.

A variety of College of Arts & Sciences departments were represented…

…as were a variety from the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies and the Robinson College of Business.

About 40 of the RDS@GSU Data Certificate awardees attended the certificate ceremony we held on Wednesday, May 1, in CURVE. At the ceremony awardees received their printed certificates along with verbal accolades from the RDS Team and Library Associate Dean Bryan Sinclair, enjoyed cake, took pictures with each other and RDS Team members, and assembled for a group picture where they proudly displayed their certificates.

And here is what some of the RDS@GSU Data Certificate awardees had to say about the experience:

The certificate is a great opportunity to become a more competitive candidate while applying for a job. The workshops were very interactive.

I thought the RDS@ GSU Data Certification incentivized my participation in the RDS workshops. The workshops themselves were great and it definitely helped me brush up on prior skills and knowledge.

Certification looks amazing on resumes, I also found what was covered useful to my practice of SAS & SPSS.

It is essential for me as a student majoring in Epidemiology. I will be involved in research, and the only way to answer some of the world’s health problems is making sense out of data. I’m confident this certificate will prove useful for me in getting a job. The entire program is flexible, and the materials are very helpful in understanding the course content.

Congratulations again to our 92 RDS@GSU Data Certificate awardees!

We commend you for your commitment to becoming data savvy, and we know what you’ve learned will benefit you in your studies and career.

Interested in getting RDS@GSU Data Certified?

Learn more here.

______________________________________________________________

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Teaching with Primary Sources Instructor Workshop: Using Sources to Build Narratives

WSB radio bannerOn Monday, April 29, Kevin Fleming, Popular Music and Culture Archivist and Jill Anderson, Humanities Instruction Librarian, are offering a “Teaching with Primary Sources: Using Sources to Build Narratives” workshop for faculty and graduate student instructors.

This is a hands-on workshop where attendees will be our “students” for an exercise involving materials from Special Collections & Archives’ radio broadcasting collections—with plenty of time for discussion and brainstorming for how you might incorporate these and related materials into your own teaching!

This workshop will be held on Monday, April 29, 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm, in the Colloquium Room, Library South 8, on the Atlanta campus.

In this workshop, you will:

  • Learn about unique materials held in GSU’s Special Collections and Archives
  • Consider how primary source materials can be the starting points for all kinds of stories
  • Experience first-hand the opportunity to create narratives – historical, or not — from unfamiliar primary sources
  • Brainstorm about ways to incorporate this narrative-building (or other uses of primary sources) into your classroom instruction
  • Consider how librarians and archivists can partner with you to design creative, effective instruction using primary sources and other library resources.

Register for this workshop here.

Please contact Jill Anderson or Kevin Fleming with questions about these workshops, or with other questions about using primary sources in your instruction.

Come be our “students” and to learn more!

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Posted in Communication, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, History, Instruction, Primary Resources, Special Collections & Archives | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Teaching with Primary Sources Instructor Workshop: Using Sources to Build Narratives

Upcoming: “Teaching with Primary Sources” Workshops

In April the Library will be offering three “Teaching with Primary Sources” workshops. “Teaching with Primary Sources” is an ongoing series of workshops designed to introduce faculty and graduate student instructors to creative strategies for using primary sources– archival, digital, and/or subscription primary sources, into classroom instruction.

Two of these workshops will be offered at the Atlanta campus, and one will be offered at the Clarkston campus. Registration is not required, but is recommended to help with planning.

Workshop #1:

cover of the first Ms. Magazine, 1972Jill Anderson, Humanities Instruction Librarian, is offering a “Teaching with Primary Sources: Using Historical Periodicals” workshop for faculty and graduate student instructors. This workshop will be held on Monday, April 1, from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm, in Room CL2220 in the Clarkston campus’ Library. 

In this hands-on workshop, attendees will be the “students” for activities drawing on historical periodicals, including those in our subscription databases, print bound volumes, and several freely-available digitized magazines.

In this workshop, you will:

  • Learn to search in several of the GSU Library’s historical-periodicals databases
  • Consider the differences and relationships between points of access (GSU’s subscription databases vs. print vs. freely available online)
  • Consider how search strategies and results can help students begin to identify a given periodical’s ideological leanings and target audience
  • Brainstorm about ways to use these databases and/or this kind of searching in classroom instruction
  • Consider how librarians can partner with you to design creative, effective instruction

Register for this workshop here.

Workshop #2

Jill Anderson will offer a repeat version of the “Teaching with Primary Sources: Using Historical Periodicals” workshop, described above, on Monday, April 8, from 1:00pm – 3:00 pm, Library Classroom 2, Library North 2, on the Atlanta campus.

Register for the Atlanta campus version of this workshop here.

Workshop #3

WSB radio bannerKevin Fleming, Popular Music and Culture Archivist and Jill Anderson are offering a “Teaching with Primary Sources: Using Sources to Build Narratives” workshop for faculty and graduate student instructors, drawing on materials from Special Collections & Archives’ radio broadcasting collections. This workshop will be held on Monday, April 29, 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm, in the Colloquium Room, Library South 8, on the Atlanta campus.

In this workshop, you will:

  • Learn about unique materials held in GSU’s Special Collections and Archives
  • Consider how primary source materials can be the starting points for all kinds of stories
  • Experience first-hand the opportunity to create narratives – historical, or not — from unfamiliar primary sources
  • Brainstorm about ways to incorporate this narrative-building (or other uses of primary sources) into your classroom instruction
  • Consider how librarians and archivists can partner with you to design creative, effective instruction.

Register for this workshop here.

Please contact Jill Anderson or Kevin Fleming with questions about these workshops, or with other questions about using primary sources in your instruction.

Come join us to learn more!

 

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2019 Georgia Women’s Movement Project Spring Event: “The Milk of Woman Kindness”

The Georgia Women’s Movement Project Spring Event is held annually to highlight collections in the Georgia State University Library Women’s Collections, and to celebrate the lives of the unsung heroines of the women’s movement in Georgia.

The 2019 event will highlight the work of women who help and serve other women and families. Sandra Barnhill (Foreverfamily), Awaz Jabari (Refugee Women’s Network), Mary Kane (Altrusa), and Deborah Richardson (International Human Trafficking Institute) will provide insights and wisdom.

Tuesday, April 23, 5:00-7:00 pm
Special Collections and Archives
University Library South, 8th Floor
100 Decatur St. SE
Atlanta, GA 30303
Register for event
or RSVP to mgerrard@gsu.edu / (404) 413-2888

 

Sandra Kay Barnhill, an attorney, is the founder and National President of Foreverfamily, a nonprofit agency created in 1987 to diminish the impact of the parent’s incarceration on the children. Foreverfamily is headquartered in Atlanta with affiliates in Atlanta and Louisville, KY.

Sandra’s pioneering work in this area has been recognized by the Ms. Foundation who awarded her their Woman of Vision Award, Barrister Magazine which heralded her as “One of Twenty Lawyers Who Make a Difference”, Savvy Magazine which selected her as “One of Forty Women Under Forty to Watch” and the Atlanta Business League which recognized her as one of Atlanta’s Top 100 Black Women of Influence. She was a 2004 recipient of the Ford Foundation’s Leadership for a Changing World Award and a 1997 recipient of an Annie E. Casey Children and Family Fellowship.

Sandra is a member of the ABA Commission on Youth At Risk and is a consultant for the National Institute of Corrections and a frequent workshop and conference presenter.

 

Awaz Jabari is the Social Adjustment and Leadership Program Coordinator for Refugee Women’s Network. Originally from northern Iraq, she has lived in the United States since 1997. She worked as Senior Case Manager/Victim Advocate for the Refugee Family Services Domestic Violence program from 2001 through 2013. She has also worked as a Self-Sufficiency Manager for Partnership for Community Action and has managed microenterprise employment programs. She received two awards for her outstanding contributions to ending violence against women in Georgia.

Awaz has more than 17 years of experience working in the nonprofit sector. She has received extensive training in providing domestic violence services, including Refugee Women’s Network leadership training, Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence Legal Advocate and Domestic Violence Advocacy training, GMAAC training for court interpretation, DeKalb Rape Crisis Center training on working with victims of sexual assault, and Client Services and Sensitivity. She has served as a board or committee member for the Policy Team of SAVE (Stop Adolescent Violence and Exploitation), The Interfaith Committee of the DeKalb County Task Force Against Domestic Violence, and Partnership for Community Action.  Awaz holds a degree in Education from Erbil Community College and a diploma as a Business Office Specialist from DeKalb Technical College. She holds a Certificate of Nonprofit Leadership and a Certificate of Supervision & Management from the Georgia Center for Nonprofits.

 

Mary Kane became an Altrusan in 1999, and has since served her Club in a variety of positions, which include President, Vice-President, Secretary and various Committee Chairs. She also served District Three as a Director and Leadership Committee Chair. She currently serves on the board of the Altrusa District Three Foundation, a 501(3)c organization. Her involvement in community organizations includes Choir Board President at her church, Service Unit Director and Troop Leader for Girl Scouts.

Mary has been a Registered Nurse for 43 years, a Certified Diabetes Educator for sixteen years and retired at the rank of Lieutenant Colonel from the U.S. Army Nurse Corps Reserves.

 

Deborah J. Richardson is a nationally recognized expert on social justice for women and girls and advocate to end human trafficking.  Twenty years ago, she pioneered some of the first programming for sexually exploited girls, then led a national campaign to eradicate the facilitation of trafficking on online platforms, testified before Congress, and advised more than 20 communities throughout the United States on organizing and implementing their efforts to address child sexual exploitation.

She is the Executive Director of the International Human Trafficking Institute of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, leading a three-year strategic plan to reduce human trafficking in Metro-Atlanta.  Deborah founded IHTI in 2014 in her former role as Executive Vice President of the Center for Civil and Human Rights.  Her impactful career includes serving as Chief Program Officer at Women’s Funding Network in San Francisco, CEO of The Atlanta Women’s Foundation, Director of Program Development for Fulton County Juvenile Court, Founding Executive Director of the Juvenile Justice Fund (now Youth Spark) and Managing Director of the National Black Arts Festival.  Since 2018 Deborah has served as the Alonzo F. and Norris B. Herndon Human Rights Expert in Residence in the Honors College of Georgia State University.

Deborah has been honored by many organizations for her community service and contributions to the field of addressing human trafficking.  Most recently she received the Lives of Commitment Award from Auburn Theological Seminary, Big Voice Award from Georgia Voices for Children, Community Service Award by Spelman College Board of Trustees and The Pathbreaker Award from Shared Hope International.

 

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Research in the Raw: Terri Lewinson

Can hotel living support positive aging in place? Dr. Terri Lewinson will explore the health benefits and challenges for aging adults living in long-stay hotels. From a health policy standpoint, she plans to describe her fellowship with Congressman John Lewis and the current international conversations in Washington, DC about housing models and assistive products that promote healthy aging in place.

According to William Frey of Brookings (2016), “more than 65 million Boomers will turn 70 in the next two decades. The 70- to 79-year-old age group will increase by more than 50% during the next 10 years and by more than 80% by 2035.” Because of the increasing numbers of Boomers in and about to enter retirement and age into their seventies, Dr. Lewinson’s research is significant as it focuses on housing and healthcare options for this generation. Dr. Lewinson’s research has implications for social services professionals as well as lawmakers who influence public policy. If you are an older adult or have an older loved one exploring housing and healthcare options or are just interested in this important topic, you will enjoy this discussion about housing and healthcare options for aging populations and have the opportunity to question an expert, Dr. Lewinson.

Dr. Lewinson, John A. Hartford Geriatric Scholar and an Associate Professor in the School of Social Work in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, has over a decade of social work practice in healthcare settings and communities of low-income and overwhelmed families. Her published work on aging in place has been shared at local and national conferences with professional social workers and interdisciplinary gerontologists where she specifically details complex life experiences of disenfranchised people residing transiently in hotels and coping with chronic and acute health challenges.

Research in the Raw is a series of informal talks in which GSU faculty members share work-in-progress. The series is brought to you by the Library’s Department of Research & Engagement.

Details:
Tuesday, March 26, 2019
4:00-5:00pm
Colloquium Room, 8th Floor Library South
Register to attend

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Posted in Faculty Publications and Research, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, Gerontology, Publications and Research, Social Work | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Research in the Raw: Terri Lewinson