Fall Newsletters for the Andrew Young School

GSU BridgeA newsletter for each department in the Andrew Young School has been published and is accessible in a new, user-friendly Research Guide:

Each newsletter includes:

  • Information on upcoming workshops
  • News and updates on popular databases and apps
  • A list of new books and videos
  • The top AYS downloads from ScholarWorks

Have a great semester Panthers!

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Posted in Books, Criminal Justice, Databases, Economics, Faculty Publications and Research, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, General News, Public Management & Policy, Research Guides, ScholarWorks @ Georgia State University, Social Work, Videos | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Georgia State University’s Humanities Programs Receive National Grant

NEHGeorgia State University’s Student Innovation Fellowship (SIF) Program and the departments of English and History have been awarded a Next Generation Humanities PhD grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). The grant is designed to transform the culture of graduate education in the humanities and substantially broaden the career prospects of PhD recipients in the humanities.

Project co-directors Brennan Collins (Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning), Denise Davidson (Dept. of History), and Dylan Ruediger (Dept. of History) will coordinate a year of intensive planning involving GSU alumni, faculty, staff, and administrators, as well as representatives from Atlanta’s arts & business communities to re-imagine the purpose, scope, and outcomes of the University’s PhD programs in the humanities.

One of 28 universities across the country to receive $25,000 in NEH funding, the project will connect GSU’s graduate programs in History and English, the high tech research projects of the SIF Program, and Atlanta’s booming creative economy.

Earlier this summer, the History Department received a similar grant aimed at fostering career diversity for its graduate students from the American Historical Association. Together, the two grants highlight considerable national recognition for Georgia State University’s ongoing efforts to build new models for the education of humanists.

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Transform Your Textbooks! Affordable Learning Georgia Textbook Transformation Grants: Round Seven

Image from: https://openstax.org/

Image from: https://openstax.org/

Affordable Learning Georgia’s Textbook Transformation Grants support the replacement of expensive commercial textbooks with low-cost, no-cost, and open educational resources.

Use existing open educational resources such as OpenStax College Textbooks, no-cost-to-students library and web resources, and new affordable authoring applications and adaptive software to equalize access to your course materials and save your students money.

The Round Six-Eight ALG Textbook Transformation Grants Request for Proposals (RFP) has been released, and Round Seven is now open. Round Seven applications are open until September 4, 2016. Round Eight has a later launch date and deadline as indicated in the Timeline section of the RFP.

Request for Proposals Link
The Request for Proposals, including all details regarding the Textbook Transformation Grants application process, is located at this link:

http://affordablelearninggeorgia.org/about/grants_rfp_rounds678

Application Link
Round Seven of Affordable Learning Georgia’s Textbook Transformation Grants is now open for applications in Georgia Tech’s InfoReady Review at this link:
https://gatech.infoready4.com/#competitionDetail/1752371

Webinars for Review
Review webinars will cover the entire application process.

Round Seven: Monday, August 8, 2016, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Register Now:
https://borusg.webex.com/borusg/k2/j.php?MTID=t2c6abb4d76684431b4737f6d30c86f80

Round Six: Tuesday, July 5, 2016, 4:00pm-5:00pm

View WebEx Archive

Round Six: Monday, July 11, 2016, 4:00pm-5:00pm

View WebEx Archive

Presentation Slides

 

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Featured Faculty Publication: Teaching Mathematics for Social Justice: Conversations with Educators

Image from: http://www.nctm.org/Store/Products/Teaching-Mathematics-for-Social-Justice--Conversations-with-Educators/

Image from: http://www.nctm.org/Store/Products/Teaching-Mathematics-for-Social-Justice–Conversations-with-Educators/

David Stinson, Associate Professor of Middle and Secondary Education, co-edited the book Teaching mathematics for social justice: conversations with educators.  The book was one of the top 75 New York Times Best Selling Education Books of 2013. You’ll find this book on the 4th floor of Atlanta Library South under the call number QA11.2 .T435 2012.

From the publisher’s website:

Educators increasingly recognize the important role that mathematics teaching plays in helping students to understand and overcome social injustice and inequality. This collection of original articles is the start of a compelling conversation among some of the leading figures in critical and social justice mathematics, a number of teachers and educators who have been inspired by them and who have inspiring stories of their own to tell-and any reader interested in the intersection of education and social justice. An important read for every educator, this book shows how to teach mathematics so that all students are given the tools they need to confront issues of social justice today and in the future.

In addition to co-editing the book, Dr. Stinson also co-authored Chapter one of the book:

Stinson, D. W., & Wager, A. (2015). Sojourn into the empowering uncertainties of teaching and learning mathematics for social change. In Wager, A. A., & Stinson, D. W. (2012). Teaching mathematics for social justice: Conversations with educators. (pp. 3-10). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Other publications by Dr. Stinson available through the University Library, include:

Stinson, D. W. (2015). The Journal handbook of research on urban mathematics teaching and learning: A resource guide for the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015. Journal Of Urban Mathematics Education, 8(2), 1-10.

Stinson, D. W. (2015, July). Reviewing for JUME: Advancing the Field of Urban Mathematics Education. Journal of Urban Mathematics Education. pp. 10-13.

Christopher C. Jett, David W. Stinson, & Brian A. Williams. (2015). Communities for and with Black Male Students. The Mathematics Teacher, 109(4), 284-289.

Stinson, D. W. (2013). Negotiating the “White Male Math Myth”: African American Male Students and Success in School Mathematics. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 44(1), 69-99.

Stinson, D. W., & Bullock, E. C. (2012). Critical Postmodern Theory in Mathematics Education Research: A Praxis of Uncertainty. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 80(1-2), 41-55.

Stinson, D. W. (2011). When the “Burden of Acting White” Is Not a Burden: School Success and African American Male Students. Urban Review: Issues and Ideas in Public Education, 43(1), 43-65.

Stinson, D. W. (2009). The Proliferation of Theoretical Paradigms Quandary: How One Novice Researcher Used Eclecticism as a Solution. Qualitative Report, 14(3), 498-523.

Stinson, D. W. (2008). Negotiating Sociocultural Discourses: The Counter-Storytelling of Academically (And Mathematically) Successful African American Male Students. American Educational Research Journal, 45(4), 975-1010.

Mewborn, D. S., & Stinson, D. W. (2007). Learning to Teach as Assisted Performance. Teachers College Record, 109(6), 1457-1487.

Stinson, D. W. (2006). African American Male Adolescents, Schooling (and Mathematics): Deficiency, Rejection, and Achievement. Review of Educational Research, 76(4), 477-506.

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Posted in Books, Faculty Publications and Research, Middle & Secondary Education, Publications and Research, Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

New Faculty Publication: Critical views on teaching and learning English around the globe

AmantibookcoverCongratulations to Cathy Amanti, Clinical Assistant Professor of Early Childhood and Elementary Education on the publication of her co-edited book, Critical views on teaching and learning English around the globe: Qualitative research approaches. From the publisher’s website:

This volume takes a critical look at teaching and learning English across the globe. Its aim is to fill a gap in the literature created by the omission of the voices of those engaged in the everyday practice of teaching and learning English; those of students, teachers, and specialists. Three unique characteristics give this book broad appeal. They include

- its inclusion of the perspectives and experiences of students and educators involved in the everyday practice of English language teaching and learning

- its inclusion of the experiences of students and educators in both core and non-core English-speaking countries

- its basis on original, qualitative studies conducted by scholars in different parts of the world including Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas

Of particular interest to applied linguists, scholars from diverse fields such as English as a Foreign/Second Language, English as an International Language, anthropology and education, English education, sociolinguistics, and bilingual education will also find value in this book. Written in accessible language, it can be used in such courses as Applied Linguistics, Second Language Classroom Contexts, Bilingualism and Multilingualism, English Around the World, Research Methodologies in Second Language Acquisition, and Research in Second Language Pedagogical Contexts. In addition, by focusing on presenting research experiences that adopt several epistemological and theoretical approaches, the book provides teachers of research with a great tool to examine varied applications of qualitative methods, data collection, and analytic techniques. Thus it could also be used for courses in Field Research and Qualitative Methods.

In addition to co-editing the book, Dr. Amanti contributed the following chapter:

Amanti, C. (2016). “‘What! You don’t know English?’: Producing, reproducing, and resisting dominant English ideologies in a Mexican high school.” In J. Álvarez, C. Amanti, S. Keyl, and E. Mackinney (Eds.), Critical views on teaching and learning English around the globe: Qualitative research approaches (pp. 87-104). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Other works by Dr. Amanti available through the University Library:

Amanti, C. (2014). When School Literacy and School Discipline Practices Intersect: Why Schools Punish Student Writing. Journal Of Language And Literacy Education, 10(1), 14-26.

Amanti, C., González, N., and Moll, L. (2008). “Case study: Using students’ cultural resources in teaching.” In A. Roseberry and B. Warren (Eds.), Teaching science to English language learners: Building on students’ strengths (pp. 99-102). National Science Teachers Association, Publishers.

Amanti, C. (1998, November 17). What really happens in a two-way bilingual classroom. Christian Science Monitor. p. 14.

Moll, L. C., Amanti, C., & Neff, D. (1992). Funds of knowledge for teaching: using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classrooms. Theory Into Practice, 31132-141. doi:10.1080/00405849209543534

 

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Posted in Education, New Resources, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

New Faculty Publication: The Near West: Medieval North Africa, Latin Europe and the Mediterranean in the Second Axial Age

cover, Allen Fromherz, The Near West: Medieval North Africa, Latin Europe and the Mediterranean in the Second Axial Age Prof. Allen Fromherz of the History Department has recently published The Near West: Medieval North Africa, Latin Europe and the Mediterranean in the Second Axial Age (2016). The Near West is a political, social, and cultural history of a common Western Mediterranean culture linking Western Europe and North Africa.

Viewing the history of North Africa and Europe through the eyes of Christian kings and Muslim merchants, emirs and popes, Sufis, friars and rabbis, this book argues that they together experienced the twelfth-century renaissance and the commercial revolution. In the midst of this common commercial growth, North Africa and Europe also shared in a burst of spirituality and mysticism, instigating a Second Axial Age in the history of religion.

Challenging the idea of a Mediterranean split between Islam and Christianity, the book shows how the Maghrib (North Africa) was not a Muslim, Arab monolith or an extension of the exotic Orient. Rather, medieval North Africa was as diverse and complex as Latin Europe. Instead of dismissing North Africa as a sideshow of European history, it should be seen as an integral part of the story. (from publisher’s information).

Prof. Fromherz is also the director of GSU”s Middle East Studies Center, and his research focuses on the Mediterranean and the Gulf. His other publications include these books:

and these articles as well:

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Posted in Books, Faculty Publications and Research, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, Global Studies, History, New Resources | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Digital Mapping Project Utilizing Georgia State, Emory University Library Resources Receives Knight Foundation Grant

atl mapGeorgia State and Emory Universities’ ATLMaps collaborative digital mapping project was one of 14 projects to win the 2016 Knight News Challenge on Libraries.

Sponsored by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the 2016 Knight News Challenge served as an open call for ideas focused on advancing libraries to better serve individuals and communities in the 21st century. More than 600 ideas were submitted for consideration.

As winners of the challenge, project leads Brennan Collins (Center for Instructional Effectiveness, Georgia State University) and Megan Slemons (Geographic Information Systems Librarian, Emory Center for Digital Scholarship) were awarded a $35,000 grant from the Knight Foundation to continue their work on ATLMaps.

The project combines archival maps, geospatial data visualization, and user-contributed multimedia location pinpoints to promote investigation into any number of issues about Atlanta. It incorporates many digitized resources from both Emory and Georgia State University Libraries, including materials from the Georgia State University Library’s Planning Atlanta, MARTA, and Works Progress Administration of Georgia Atlanta Maps collections.

Georgia State University’s portion of the award will be used to fund Student Innovation Fellowships. Student fellows will add content to the project and enhance the ATLMaps website’s search and customization capabilities.

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Transform Your Textbooks! Affordable Learning Georgia Textbook Transformation Grants: Round Six

CC BY-NC-SA-http://open.lib.umn.edu/criminallaw/

CC BY-NC-SA-http://open.lib.umn.edu/criminallaw/

Affordable Learning Georgia’s Textbook Transformation Grants support the replacement of expensive commercial textbooks with low-cost, no-cost, and open educational resources.

Use existing open educational resources such as OpenStax College Textbooks, no-cost-to-students library and web resources, and new affordable authoring applications and adaptive software to equalize access to your course materials and save your students money.

The Round Six ALG Textbook Transformation Grants Request for Proposals (RFP) is now open for applications until July 31, 2016. Rounds Seven and Eight have later launch dates and deadlines as indicated in the Timeline section of the RFP.

Request for Proposals Link

The Request for Proposals, including all details regarding the Textbook Transformation Grants application process, is located at this link:

http://affordablelearninggeorgia.org/about/grants_rfp_rounds678

Application Link

Round Six of Affordable Learning Georgia’s Textbook Transformation Grants is now open for applications in Georgia Tech’s InfoReady Review at this link:

https://gatech.infoready4.com/#competitionDetail/1752228

Webinars for Review

There will be at least one webinar per round for RFP review and Q&A.

Round Six: Tuesday, July 5, 2016, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Meeting Link

Password: open

Round Six: Monday, July 11, 2016, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Meeting Link

Password: open

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Posted in For Faculty, Instruction, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Student Publication: Lights, Camera, Action

Sewordor_EmefaEmefa Sewordor, a doctoral student in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies  along with professor David Sjoquist have a new publication, Lights, Camera, Action: The Adoption of State Film Tax Credits (Summer 2016).

Over the last 20 years, states have adopted tax incentives focused on film production. Louisiana adopted the first state tax incentive program for film production in 1992, and by 2009 such tax incentive programs had expanded to 44 states plus the District of Columbia. The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors that explain the pattern of adoption of state film tax incentive programs. We develop a theoretical framework for analyzing states’ decision to adopt these programs that considers both internal characteristics and diffusion. We empirically investigate the timing of states’ adoption of film tax incentives using the Cox proportional hazards model with time-varying predictors. The estimates of many of the hazard ratios are consistent with our expectation, although several are statistically insignificant. As expected, the pattern of adoption across states supports the hypothesis that it is a ‘mimicking’ phenomenon. However, we find that fiscal stress results in faster adoption of film tax credits, contrary to expectations, but consistent with the notion that states look at them as a ‘luxury.’

Other articles on Georgia’s tax incentive for film:

That Old Zombie Charm.” Economist 417.8960 (2015): 36.

Cody, Reade. “The Power Of Entertainment Tax Credits.” Tax Adviser 44.12 (2013): 811-812.

Wells, Steve, and Mark Ross. “One For The Money, Two For The Show…” Take Two.” Journal Of State Taxation 31.3 (2013): 33-47.

Sewordor also co-authored another publication:

Hildreth, W. Bartley, Emefa Sewordor, and Gerald J. Miller. 2011. “State Government Catastrophe Risk Financing and the Capital Markets.” Proceedings Of The Annual Conference On Taxation 104, 56-61.

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Posted in Economics, Faculty Publications and Research, Graduate Student Publications and Research, Public Management & Policy | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

New Digital Collection: GSU Yearbooks

SGA

Left: Student Council members, University System of Georgia Evening School, 1934. Right: Student Government Association members, Georgia State University, 1996.

Georgia State University’s yearbooks are now available online. The digital collection includes annual yearbooks dating from 1934–when the college became the independent Evening School of the University System of Georgia, having previously been a unit of the Georgia School of Technology–to 1996. During the 1930s and 1940s, the school had separate day and night divisions; the divisions published separate yearbooks, meaning that some years will have more than one volume. The yearbooks had various names throughout the years, including Nocturne, Survey, Junior College, Gateway, and, most recently, Rampway. Users can browse the collection by decade, by date, or by the name of the institution (the college went through several name changes before becoming Georgia State University in 1969).

 

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Posted in Digital Collections, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, Primary Resources, Resources, Special Collections & Archives | Tagged , | 4 Comments