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Atlanta Library North 3rd floor

At the end of February 2018, the University Library administered a survey to a random sample of 5,000 Georgia State students currently enrolled at all campuses. This post is one in a series that highlights a survey trend and the library’s response. We welcome your feedback anytime

Atlanta Library North 5th floor

Whenever the library solicits feedback from students, we can expect to get a ton of requests for more electrical outlets. The spring survey was no exception! You need more places to plug in and recharge your devices. We’ve been at work this summer to help you stay connected academically and personally. This month the Atlanta library added a total of 40 outlets to Library North floors 3, 4, and 5. See those black domes in the photos? Outlets! The Clarkston library added 13 outlets to its new seating area on the main level.

Clarkston Library wall outlets

Thanks to the library’s Facilities team for ensuring the success of these projects.

 

 

 

 

 


About the Author

Jennifer Jones is the Assessment & User Experience Librarian. She helps the library focus on continuous improvement through goal setting, evaluation, and user feedback.

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Your University Library needs you.

Apply now to join the 2018-19 Student Library Advisory Council. The Student Library Advisory Council exists to provide the Atlanta Library with a student perspective on library services, resources, facilities, and policies.

What’s in it for you:

  • Gain leadership experience
  • Effect change
  • Engage with your campus

What the library needs from you:

  • A one-year commitment (with the opportunity to extend your service)
  • Attendance at one meeting per month during the academic year
  • Constructive feedback and creative ideas
  • Engagement with the library’s social media accounts
  • Willingness to serve as a library advocate

We invite Atlanta undergraduate and graduate students to apply now through September 4. Send your questions to Jennifer Jones.

 

About the Author

Jennifer Jones is the Assessment & User Experience Librarian. She helps the library focus on continuous improvement through goal setting, evaluation, and user feedback.

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Still looking for a textbook or other course content?

textbook cover

Foundations of Health Information Technology by Chi Zhang and Robert Brown CCBY

Fall semester is just around the corner, so if you’re an instructor in search of a textbook or other course content, take a look at these resources which provide open textbooks. Unlike textbooks with all rights reserved copyright restrictions, open textbooks are freely available online and allow for copying, printing, and sharing. Many open textbooks also allow adaptation so that the content can be modified for individual instructional needs. Take a look at the license for each book to be sure what it allows.

Here are the top five places to find open textbooks:

Top 100 highest enrolled courses:  The highest enrolled courses in all of the University System of Georgia with links to currently used open textbooks and suggestions for which open textbook might work for you.

OER Metafinder: Developed by George Mason University, this tool currently searches 17 open content repositories simultaneously.

College Open Textbooks: Aggregates listings of open textbooks from across the web. Over 600 open textbooks sorted by discipline. Many of the textbooks include peer reviews.

OpenStax: Currently, there are only 44 textbooks in this collection, but they meet rigorous peer review requirements, scope and sequence requirements, and offer ancillary materials and affordable online homework options.

Open Textbook Library: (A Project of UMN) This library offers hundreds of open textbooks on a variety of subjects. You can read a review of the textbook and see the credentials/affiliation of the reviewer.

If you still don’t find what you are looking for, take a look at the GSU Library’s Open Education Guide. Or, contact Denise Dimsdale, Affordable Learning Georgia Library Coordinator, at the GSU Library. The GSU Library is happy to assist instructors with locating open resources, publishing open content, and locating course content and library resources that provide affordable options for students and pedagogical opportunities for instructors.

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RFP: Textbook Transformation Grants, Fall 2018-19-Due September 10

GSU Open Textbook Cover

An example of a GSU open textbook: https://oer.galileo.usg.edu/english-textbooks/14/

Adopt, adapt, or create an open or affordable textbook alternative with an Affordable Learning Georgia (ALG) grant. Learn more at the Request for Proposals for Textbook Transformation Grants. This RFP is for Round 12, and applications are due by September 10, 2018. Projects have a maximum Final Semester of Fall 2019.

To apply:

  1. Read the Request for Proposals Document.
  2. Read the new 2018 Rubric for Peer Review.
  3. Fill out the Word version of the Application Form and keep this form for your records.
  4. Fill out the Online Application Form.

The Online Application Form is still in development, but will contain the same content as the Word version of the form and will be located on the Round Twelve RFP Page. Return to this page to view the completed Online Application Form when announced in the newsletter.

Webinars will be held for a general introduction to the application process and Q&A:

YouTube Archive: July 23, 2018, 2:00pm
Next information session: August 7, 2018, 2:00pm

The Georgia State University Library provides assistance with the grant process and with locating course content to fulfill grant requirements. Additionally, the GSU library coordinates with the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning for related pedagogical and instructional technology needs. For additional information or assistance, please contact Denise Dimsdale, ALG Library Coordinator or Laura Carruth, ALG Campus Champion.

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UCL Press: An Open Access University Press

Book cover: Treasures from UCL

This book is published under a CC BY-NC-SA license. Front image: The Trevelyon manuscript; the Tudor rose, prominently featured (fol. 53r).

Reclaiming its license from commercial publishers, the University College London (UCL) Press, began operations under UCL’s Library Services in 2015 as “the first fully Open Access University Press in the UK”. The new vision and mission of the press includes using innovative technologies and ideas to establish open access as the primary scholarly publishing practice across disciplines. Most UCL Press journals are licensed with a CC-BY license. Books are licensed with a Creative Commons license chosen by the author. UCL Press’ commitment to open provides for a greater global reach for its content. The press’ use of flexible licensing options make way for innovative pedagogies and other creative scholarship that may not be possible with all rights reserved content.

In keeping with traditional quality measures, everything published through UCL Press is peer-reviewed. Although the press publishes a variety of formats, there is a focus on monographs with UCL Press publishing over 80 books in the past three years.

Explore a few UCL Press publications below:

Books:

Textbooks:

Or browse all eight UCL Press journals here.

For authors who want to publish open content through UCL Press, faculty, students, and other members of the UCL community publish for free. Authors who are not from UCL, are charged APCs (article processing charges) when applicable and BPCs (Book processing charges). However, waivers for BPCs are available for non-funded authors. Find out more about publishing through UCL Press here.

If you’d like to publish open content or if you’d like to use open content and don’t find what you need through UCL Press, there are many other options available. Take a look at the GSU Library’s Open Education Guide. Or, contact Denise Dimsdale, Affordable Learning Georgia Library Coordinator, at the GSU Library. The GSU Library is happy to assist instructors with locating open resources, publishing open content, and locating course content and library resources that provide affordable options for students and pedagogical opportunities for instructors.

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Open Library for the Humanities

Becky Chilcott. The Constructivist Poster: https://www.openlibhums.org/site/academics/poster-series/

Although the Open Library for the Humanities (OLH) was launched only two years ago, their responsiveness to the specific needs of Humanities researchers provides a promising foundation for the creation and sustainability of high-quality open content for the field. Currently, the platform hosts 23 open journals for all to use. OLH’s business model eliminates author imposed Article Process Charges (APC) in favor of a consortium based business model. There’s no requirement for authors or their institutions to be or become consortium members in order to publish on OLH. Journals on OLH are by default licensed with a CCBY (Creative Commons-Attribution) license, but authors have the option to add a more restrictive license if they choose. Creative Commons licenses provide flexibility for activities such as the creation of course packs, online pedagogy and digital humanities projects.

Works on OLH are:

  • Fulfilling current submission criteria for the UK’s Research Excellence Framework
  • Rigorously peer review
  • Assigned a DOI for improved indexing/findability
  • Open: Freely available for users and free for authors to publish
  • Archived with sustainable archiving processes

See all 23 journals or explore a few here:

OLH also curates special collections of articles in the OLH journal such as:

You might use OLH if you’d like to find open content for your course or your Digital Humanities project. You might also use OLH if you’d like to publish on a rigorous open platform without having to pay article process charges. If you don’t find what you are looking for on OLH, take a look at the GSU Library’s Open Education Guide. Or, contact Denise Dimsdale, Affordable Learning Georgia Library Coordinator, at the GSU Library. The GSU Library is happy to assist instructors with locating open resources, publishing open content, and locating course content and library resources that provide affordable options for students and pedagogical opportunities for instructors.

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Posted in Applied Linguistics and ESL, Art & Design, Digital Collections, Education, Ejournals, English, Film & Media, For Faculty, Global Studies, History, Instruction, Philosophy, Primary Resources, Publications and Research, Religious Studies | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

ZoteroBib for creating bibliographies quickly and easily

Lots of researchers love the easy, powerful, and free reference manager Zotero.

You can take advantage of many of the great features of Zotero with their new web-based bibliography creator, ZoteroBib. You don’t have to install any software, there are no ads, and it’s free.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Go to ZoteroBib at zbib.org.
  2. Enter a title, URL, ISBN, or other identifier for the source you’re citing.
  3. When you’re done entering sources, select the citation style you need (over 9000 styles available) and copy your bibliography to paste into your document.
  4. Don’t forget to double-check with your style manual – watch for capitalization and punctuation errors in particular.

Why should you use ZoteroBib instead of the Zotero, EndNote or Mendeley desktop applications?

  • Because you can’t or don’t want to install any software
  • You just need to create a quick bibliography without learning a new program
  • You don’t need to save or organize your sources for later projects

Why should you use Zotero, EndNote or Mendeley instead of ZoteroBib?

  • Saving and organizing sources in a personal library for long-term reference
  • Adding citations/footnotes into your Word document as you write
  • Adding your own notes, saving PDFs and other attachments
  • Synchronizing your personal library in the cloud and across multiple computers

Ask one of your GSU librarians for help and advice. For more info:

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Meet a Librarian: Ida Martinez

photo of Ida Martinez

Meet Ida…

Who is Ida?

Ida is the subject librarian for Psychology and also the library’s liaison to the Honors College and the Global Studies program. She supports research in these areas through consultations and instruction. She particularly enjoys the outreach aspect of her liaison duties. The more people from her departments that she gets to meet and help, the better, so Ida makes a lot of efforts to reach out and communicate what a great place the GSU Library is, and how she can help them navigate our services and collections.

What has Ida studied? Where is she from?

Ida holds a BA in Psychology from the University of Notre Dame, and a MLIS from Dominican University.

Ida was raised in El Paso, Texas; since leaving home at 18, she has lived in Indiana, New Mexico, Illinois, New York, and now in Georgia. Librarianship was a career change for Ida, who spent close to 12 years working in university student services, such as admissions and academic advising. She has been a subject specialist librarian since 2002, and has supported areas including Latino Studies, Education, and Psychology.

What does Ida like to do?

Outside of librarianship Ida volunteers her time to caring for homeless cats through a no-kill shelter in northeast Atlanta that has been around since 2002. Ida has been volunteering with them since 2011, concentrating mostly on their senior special-needs room which houses cats that are considered “sanctuary” cats (i.e., unadoptable). The work involves mostly cleaning, but also offering affection and playtime for cats that are overlooked. In the past 5 years, she has fostered about 10 cats from the shelter so that they can live out their last few weeks, or months, or years in a loving home. Currently, six senior special-needs cats from the shelter are living out their golden years with Ida. She has a particularly special bond with a 14-year-old samurai kitty from Japan named Musashi.

samurai cat named Musashi

… and meet Musashi!

It’s not all cats for Ida. She also does a lot of reading, and tries to do the majority of PopSugar’s annual reading challenge. She gets to read a lot of genres that she normally would not venture into, like “Nordic noir.” She does everything possible to regularly visit her siblings in Chicago (she went four times last year). And, Ida does a lot of the logistics involved in preparing for and traveling to cities that host marathons (her husband is the runner; she is his de facto manager). There’s a lot that goes into managing a marathon maniac.

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June 2018 GLBT Book Month – and Archives, Too!

GLBT Book Month, American Library Association, below a book with rainbow pagesJune is the American Library Association’s GLBT Book Month, a nationwide celebration of the authors and writings that reflect the lives and experiences of the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender community.

Since 2011, the University Library’s Special Collections and Archives has been documenting LGBT+ life in Georgia and the South with its Gender & Sexuality Collections. The collections are comprised of personal papers, records of organizations, photographs, textiles, artifacts, books and periodicals, video and sound recordings, and oral history interviews.

Among our holdings are the very recently digitized Michael B. Maloney Collection of Out TV Atlanta Video Recordings. Out TV Atlanta, a half-hour weekly news and entertainment show, ran from 1999-2000. The brainchild of Michael B. Maloney, the show was supported financially by family and friends. Maloney used his funds to purchase air time, and Out TV aired in Atlanta and Savannah. As producer of the show, Maloney saw that most of the coverage of LGBTQ life involved night clubs and drag queens, and he wanted to focus on “ordinary” gay people who were fire fighters, attorneys, and regular members of the community.

In 2016, Maloney was introduced to GSU’s Special Collections by Ryan Roemerman, Executive Director of the Center for Civil and Human Rights’ LGBT Institute. The official records of the Institute live in the Gender & Sexuality Collections, and the Institute also directs donors who wish to place their collections in a local repository. Digitization of Maloney’s 252 digital videos was made possible by the Digital Libraries of Georgia Subgrants Award Program, and with the very prompt services of Preserve South, Inc. The digital content is currently being prepared for access by our colleagues in the Library’s Digital Projects Unit. Over the next few weeks and months, videos will be indexed and made available in a playlist via the Library’s YouTube channel.

 

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June 2018 GLBT Book Month: Searching the Catalog for Books

GLBT Book Month, American Library Association, below a book with rainbow pagesHave you ever looked up a book in the library catalog and checked out the “Details” section for that book? Looking at a book’s “Details” will point you towards citation information for a book, but it will also point you to a list of “Subjects” related to that book. These “Subjects” are usually links that will take you to other books “about” that particular subject in the library’s catalog.

Libraries and librarians use subject terms to help describe resources. They are part of what librarians call a “controlled vocabulary”—they aren’t 100% hard and fast terms, since terminology changes over time, but they are set, agreed-upon terms that follow particular patterns. Most college and university libraries in the United States and even some libraries worldwide use the Library of Congress Subject Headings, established by the Library of Congress. Once you begin identifying useful subject terms and using them to search the catalog, you will get results that bring together books that have all been identified as being “about” that subject. Because there are variations, it’s always good to look at a book’s subject terms to see what other terms were used to categorize the book—which helps you find more search terms that can help you find more resources.

There are two ways to search by “subject” in the library’s catalog:

  • Click on “Browse Search” on the “Catalog” tab. The default Browse option is “Browse by subject,” which allows you to type in a keyword or subject term and be directed to relevant subject terms.
  • Click on “Advanced Search” and select “Subject” in an “Any Field” dropdown menu.

Examples of useful subject terms to help you search for materials relating to LGBTQ+ studies:

  • Queer theory
  • Homosexuality
  • Lesbians
  • Gays — Identity
  • Gay Teachers (try also with other occupational categories)
  • African American Gays (notice that the category is African American Gays, not Gay African Americans… hmm…)
  • Bisexuality
  • Transgender
  • Intersex
  • Sexual orientation
  • Queer
  • Gay Rights
  • Female impersonators (interestingly, not Drag queens… hmm…)

You can also try “subject” searches on names, places, and even events to help narrow your searching if needed:

  • Mock, Janet, 1983-
  • Milk, Harvey
  • Stonewall Riots, New York, N.Y., 1969
  • Divine, 1945-1988

Because subject terms are created—and assigned—according to the intellectual currents of when the specific book was cataloged, there can be gaps and lags between a community’s usage of terms and the assignment/creation of LC Subject Headings. Doing a Browse Search by subject for Homosexuals will turn up lists up related subject terms, one for homosexuals not specified by gender, one for “Homosexuals, Female” and one for “Homosexuals, Male.” Doing a Browse Search by subject for Nonbinary (or Nonbinary Gender) will turn up a list of related subject terms as well, beginning with Gender nonconformity.

Cataloging librarians can propose changes in the LC Subject Headings; these have to go through an approved process and the process can be contentious. (For example, the Library of Congress still uses the subject term “Illegal Aliens” in spite of librarians’ pressure to switch to a term like “Noncitizen” or “Undocumented Immigrant.” For more on this story, click here). But these interventions can also be successful. As of 2016, Asexuality (Sexual Orientation) and Asexual People are now official LC Subject Terms. (If you’re curious about the journey those two headings took, click here for more information)

cover, Melissa Adler, Cruising the LibraryMelissa Adler’s fascinating book Cruising the Library: Perversities in the Organization of Knowledge (2017) offers an in-depth discussion of the evolution (some might say devolution?) of terms relating to expanding sexualities within the Library of Congress Subject Headings.

Questions on how to find books and other resources related to LGBTQ+ topics? See our LGBTQ+ Studies research guide, or ask a librarian!

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Posted in Books, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments