5 Days to Have Your Say: You want more outlets.

During the period February 6-10, the library solicited feedback from users at each campus library and online. You responded with about 900 distinct comments; clearly you have a lot to tell us, and we appreciate the information! Over the next several weeks, we’ll respond to your major concerns.

Based on your feedback, you want more electrical outlets to plug in your devices. As one respondent noted, “we need outlets, and we need them NOW.” We hear you and are adding outlets on an ongoing basis. As an example, in spring and summer 2016 the Atlanta Campus Library added outlets with USB ports to a new counter seating area on Library South 4 and to new seating areas on the 3rd, 4th, and 5th floors of Library North. Adding electrical outlets is an infrastructure challenge and isn’t as easy as it might seem, but we are adding them where we can.

Please keep checking back for additional responses to your 5 Days to Have Your Say feedback and further information about the Library Master Plan. You can offer your feedback anytime here.

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Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Upcoming Webinar: Introduction to Online Literary Research

If you find searching for literary criticism or information about an author to be a daunting task, this webinar is for you!

Librarians Scott Pieper (Decatur) and Sarah Kirkley (Clarkston) explain search strategies for literature research projects, demonstrate databases especially for literature, and show you how to get relevant results on literature topics when using the Discover search and general-topic databases.

Open to everyone, but designed especially to meet the research challenges typical of freshman and sophomore classes, this one-hour webinar will demonstrate the basics of finding your way around GSU Library’s research databases for any subject area and give you tips to make your searches more efficient and effective.

Introduction to Online Literary Research
Tuesday, March 21, 2017
2 pm – 3 pm
Sign up

Check out the webinar archives if you can’t make it to one of these webinars or want to see one of our past webinars, including Getting Started with Online Library Research, and  our newest, Can You Believe It?! Evaluating information sources for credibility.”

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Posted in For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, Instruction | 1 Comment

Special Collections Celebrates International Women’s Day

In the heart Women’s History Month, International Women’s Day is celebrated around the world on March 8. In recognition of this special day, we would like to highlight a collection with a strong international focus. Part of the Archives for Research on Women and Gender, the Nancy N. Boothe Papers include many items collected at the Fourth World Conference on Women, which took place in Beijing, China, in 1995. 189 governments and more than 5,000 representatives from 2,100 non-governmental organizations participated in the Beijing Conference. The principal themes were the advancement and empowerment of women in relation to women’s human rights, women and poverty, women and decision-making, the girl-child, violence against women and other areas of concern. The resulting documents of the Conference are The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action. The U.N. Fourth World Conference on Women manifested a global women’s movement for change and has been called “the Woodstock of the women’s movement.”

Nancy Boothe became the Executive Director of Atlanta’s Feminist Women’s Health Center in 1994, and in 1995, she attended the Beijing Conference on Women, where she taught a workshop, “GYN Self-Help.” In 2016, the Boothe Papers, along with the Committee on Women, Population and the Environment’s Depo Diaries Records were digitized with the support of a grant from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM). The digital collection, which is completely word-searchable, is available on the Library’s website. Boothe has also been interviewed for the Activist Women Oral History Project, and a transcript of her oral history is available in the Special Collections Department Reading Room and upon request.

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Posted in Communication, Digital Collections, Education, English, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, General News, Global Studies, Health Administration, History, Oral Histories, Primary Resources, Sociology, Special Collections & Archives, Uncategorized, Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies | 1 Comment

Religion & Public Life Event

The Department of Religious Studies will present its 2017 Religion & Public Life Event on the topic of Religion, Race, & Reconciliation: Overcoming Social Polarization in the Current Political Climate on Tuesday. The event will be a moderated Discussion with Sylvester Johnson, Ph.D. (Northwestern University) and Rep. Scott Holcomb (General Assembly, Georgia).

Event description: The polarization of American society in both formal politics as well as in cultural life is reaching a new threshold of animosity and antagonism. With Georgia as an overwhelming conservative state and Atlanta as an overwhelming liberal city, our local communities are particularly affected by the contemporary state of affairs. However, Atlanta has also served as a national model of reconciliation and progress despite overwhelming odds. In the spirit of routing our current impasse, this panel hopes to unpack the historical precedents that have led to the current polarization in our body-politic and identify practical solutions that can lead to a mitigation of that tension.

Date and Time: March 7 at 5:00 PM; Reception at 4:30.
Location: The Lobby of the Rialto Center for the Arts, 80 Forsyth St. NW, Atlanta.

Recent publications by Dr. Johnson include:

African American Religions, 1500-2000: Colonialism, Democracy and Freedom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.

The Rise of Black Ethnics: African American Religions and the Ethnic Turn, 1916-1945Religion and American Culture 20 (2010): 125-163.

“The Bible, Slavery, and the Problem of Authority,” in Beyond Slavery: Overcoming Its Religious and Sexual Legacies. Edited by Bernadette Brooten. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

“The Black Church,” in The Companion to Religion in America. Edited by Philip Goff. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2010.

Colonialism, Biblical World-Making, and Temporalities in Olaudah Equiano’s Interesting Narrative,” Church History 77 (2008): 1003-1024.

“Religion Proper and Proper Religion : Arthur Fauset and the Study of African American Religions,” in The New Black Gods : Arthur Huff Fauset and the study of African American Religions. Edited by Edward Curtis IV and Danielle Sigler. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2009.

New Israel, New Canaan: The Bible, the People of God, and the American Holocaust,” Union Seminary Quarterly Review 59, nos. 1-2 (2005): 25-39.

The Myth of Ham in Nineteenth-Century American Christianity: Race, Heathens, and the People of God. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.

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Posted in General News, Religious Studies | 3 Comments

5 Days to Have Your Say: You want enforcement of or changes to library policies.

During the period February 6-10, the library solicited feedback from users at each campus library and online. You responded with about 900 distinct comments; clearly you have a lot to tell us, and we appreciate the information! Over the next several weeks, we’ll respond to your major concerns.

Based on your feedback, you want the library to enforce certain policies at the Atlanta Campus Library, like the food and drink policy and the expectation of quiet on the 5th floor. The library’s food and drink policy states that food is not permitted at computer stations, and that all drinks must be covered. There are additional restrictions, such as no food and drink in CURVE and in certain group study rooms. While we make our best effort to enforce these rules, it can be difficult with more than 400 computer stations and 60 group study rooms spread out over five floors in Library North and eight in Library South. You can help us by reminding those around you of the policies and letting an employee know of policy violations. The same holds true for maintaining a quiet atmosphere. It is difficult to monitor and enforce noise in a facility this size. Please help us by reminding those around you to maintain a respectful volume, turn down headphones, and keep group conversations to a minimum. You can also let an employee know about excessive noise.

Please keep checking back for additional responses to your 5 Days to Have Your Say feedback and further information about the Library Master Plan. You can offer your feedback anytime here. We also invite you to stop by the first floor of Library North on March 7, between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., to participate in our Library Master Plan process.

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Workshop: Mapping US Urban Demographics with Social Explorer

Want to use maps to visualize demographic data but afraid it’s too hard to learn? Come to this workshop to see just how easy it is!

socialexplorerimageStarting with this short New York Times article about urban poverty – “Sparkling and Blighted, Convention Cities Spotlight Ignored Urban Issues”, Joe Hurley, our Data Services and GIS Librarian, will demonstrate how to use Social Explorer to map the current and historical demographic statistics references in the article. This will be followed by a demonstration of mapping inequality and race in Atlanta and a brief discussion of how Social Explorer’s demographic data mapping features can be used for both teaching and research.

Dates:

  • Tuesday, March 21, 2017, 2:00pm – 3:00pm, CURVE (Library South 2nd floor) – REGISTER HERE

Questions? Ask Joe Hurley.

Learn more about upcoming data-related workshops and the Library’s other data services & support offerings here!

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Posted in Data Services, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students | Leave a comment

Workshop: OpenRefine for Cleaning and Organizing Data

openrefineGot messy data and want to learn techniques for getting it analysis-ready in an efficient manner? Come to this workshop!

In this workshop Ximin Mi, Business Data Services Librarian, and Tricia Clayton, Collection Services Librarian, will introduce the open source application OpenRefine for cleaning and transforming data into more standard and machine read-able formats. OpenRefine is available for Windows, Mac, Linux. You are encouraged to bring in your own laptop for the purpose of practicing on your own device.

Dates:

  • Wednesday, March 22, 2017, 3:00pm – 4:00pm, Library North Classroom 2 (2nd floor above Saxby’s) – REGISTER HERE
  • Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 3:00pm – 4:00pm, Library North Classroom 2 (2nd floor above Saxby’s) – REGISTER HERE

Questions? Ask Ximin Mi.

Learn more about upcoming data-related workshops and the Library’s other data services & support offerings here!

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Posted in Data Services, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students | Leave a comment

Human Anatomy Students Create 3D Models in CURVE

Students in Dr. Carmen Eilertson’s Biology 4687/6687 Surgical Anatomy course have been busy in CURVE – Collaborative University Research & Visualization Environment this semester creating detailed 3D models of human organs from their cadaveric dissections. Cadaveric dissection is a critical part of medical education, and under the direction of “Dr. E,” even undergraduate biology students at Georgia State gain exposure to human anatomical specimens for learning and research.

Here, undergraduate student Kenya Thrasher scans a human heart using a NextEngine laser scanner in CURVE’s 3D Modeling Lab:

CURVE’s 3D scanners enhance research and learning by enabling students and instructors to convert physical artifacts into 3D digital objects for up-close study and analysis and for sharing with other students and the broader research community. The scanning hardware and software can be used to create virtual models of objects for learning and research across disciplines.

Once their high-resolution scans are complete, Dr. E’s students will be able to zoom in and analyze each organ’s features from multiple angles. As part of this assignment, students will also label the features on each digital model.

Thanks to the Student Innovation Fellows Program and Center for Excellence in Teaching in Learning at Georgia State for their support of this innovative project.

For additional information about 3D modeling technology at Georgia State University Library, see Digital Scholarship Librarian Spencer Roberts’ recent post on Photogrammetry Resources in CURVE.

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Atlanta Campus: Help Design the Library of the Future

The Georgia State University Library is working with an architectural firm to imagine and plan for the GSU Library of the future. We want to hear your thoughts and ideas!

Date & Time: Tuesday, March 7th, 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Location: Library North, 1st floor (next to Saxby’s)

As a reminder, formal identification is required for admittance to the Library. Georgia State University students, faculty, and staff may present either a registered fingerprint or valid PantherCard. Visitors must present a state-issued ID, such as a driver’s license.

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Posted in For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, General News, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Gerontology Lecture: “Remembering the Good Times: A Caregiver’s Journey”

The GSU Gerontology Institute is hosting its annual Barbara Pittard Payne Lectureship in Gerontology on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 at 6:00pm at Centennial Hall:

“Remembering the Good Times: A Caregiver’s Journey,” by Bern Nadette Stanis, best known as Thelma Evans from the hit television show Good Times and Alzheimer’s Association National Spokesperson.

Bern Nadette Stanis is not only a talented actress but also a prolific writer. Her most recent work, The Last Night: A Caregiver’s Journey, profiles the walk of a loving daughter with a beloved mother diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. It was created to inspire caregivers all around the world. Her presentation will explore the importance of remembering the lives of those who are suffering from this awful disease and embracing the caregivers who are by their sides.

For more information & to RSVP by March 13, 2017, please visit http://paynelecture2017.eventbrite.com

Below are a selection of books the University Library has related to Alzheimer’s caregiving – and click here to see more:

And we have several documentary films on Alzheimer’s caregiving you can stream from our Kanopy film databaseclick here to see more.

Interested in gerontology/aging research? Check out the Library’s Gerontology Research Guide or contact the Gerontology Librarian.

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Posted in Books, Databases, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, Gerontology, Videos | Leave a comment