Sprawling of Atlanta: Visualizing Metropolitan Area Change, 1940s to Present

The University Library launches an interactive web map, visualizing the extensive built environment and demographic changes that have occurred throughout the metropolitan region from the 1940s to the present. 

Sprawling of Atlanta: Visualizing Metropolitan Area Change, 1940s to Present

ATLANTA—”The Sprawling of Atlanta” is an interactive Web map created by Georgia State University Library that enables researchers, students and the public to visualize the extensive built environment and demographic changes that have occurred throughout the metropolitan region from the 1940s to the present. The project provides aerial imagery overlays of the five core metropolitan counties – Fulton, DeKalb, Cobb, Gwinnett and Clayton, documenting eight decades of growth and change in our region. Also included are census tract-level population and housing data, providing additional context to these visualizations. Among the changing patterns revealed are the dramatic growth of the suburbs, decline in agricultural areas, decline and rebuilding of the urban core and shifting racial and housing patterns. Joseph Hurley, data services and Global Information System librarian, and Katheryn Nikolich, Ph.D. candidate in History, led the project, with assistance from Georgia State Honors College student assistant Carson Kantoris.

https://lib.gsu.edu/sprawling-atl

Credit

Hurley, Joseph A., and Katheryn L. Nikolich, “The Sprawling of Atlanta: Visualizing Metropolitan Area Growth and Decline, 1940s to Present,” Georgia State University Library, accessed [current Month Date, Year]

Questions? Contact our Digital Library Services at digitalcollections@gsu.edu.

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Yanni Loukissas’ Data in the ATL talk discussed Thinking Critically in a Data-Driven Society

Data in the ATL is a speaker series hosted by Georgia State University Library that connects the university community with prominent members of the Atlanta data community.

Invited speakers show the importance of data science in making informed decisions and how they use data analysis and expertise in their daily work.

On Friday September 20th, the university library welcomed Yanni Loukissas, Assistant Professor of Digital Media, School of Literature, Media & Communication at Georgia Tech. 

Loukissas is the author of All Data Are Local (MIT Press, 2019).  In his book, he argues that practitioners (in academia and beyond) who want to make sense of unfamiliar data must begin to think in terms of data settings – defined by the contexts in which data are made and used – not simply data sets

While The term data set implies something discrete, complete, and portable, Loukissas believes academics should approach data sets with an awareness that data are created by humans and their dutiful machines, at a time, in a place, with the instruments at hand, for audiences that are conditioned to receive them. 

[Watch Video]

Click here to learn more about Data in the ATL and to see a list of upcoming speakers

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Qualitative researchers: This presentation is for YOU!

The Logics and Logistics of Qualitative Research: A Framework for Exploring Concepts, Dimensions, and Relationships in Qualitative Data using NVivo Qualitative Research Software

  • When? Wednesday, October 2, 11:00am-12:30pm
  • Where? CURVE (Library South 2nd floor) – REGISTER HERE

In this presentation, Dr. Ralph LaRossa, Professor Emeritus of Sociology, and Dr. Mandy Swygart-Hobaugh, Librarian Associate Professor for Sociology & Data Services and Team Leader for Research Data Services, will present both the theoretical-methodological logics and the applied-methodological logistics of conducting qualitative data analysis (i.e., non-statistical analysis of textual, audio, visual, and/or audiovisual sources).

Dr. LaRossa will discuss the steps involved in building theoretically-rich qualitative analyses (the logics). Dr. Swygart-Hobaugh will outline the specific features of NVivo qualitative research software that complement and facilitate these analyses (the logistics). There also will be opportunities for questions and discussion.

This presentation will be especially helpful for faculty and graduate students who are immersed – or about to be immersed – in a qualitative project and would like an overview on how to do qualitative analysis and how to use NVivo in the process. Those interested in publishing qualitative work and/or applying for grants based on qualitative work will also find it helpful.

NOTE: This presentation will NOT involve hands-on NVivo training – see the workshop listings on this page for hands-on NVivo training opportunities for Georgia State University affiliates.

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Shana Latimer travels to two university archives to complete dissertation research

The Georgia State University’s Dissertation Library Travel Award, which grants doctoral students with financial assistance to support their research travel, helped Ph.D. student Shana Latimer travel to Texas to gather research for her dissertation topic titled, Disambiguating Dystopia: Readjusting the Critical Lens on Twentieth Century Dystopian Literature.

Latimer visited Texas State University for the Cormac McCarthy archives and the University of Texas at Austin for Kazuo Ishiguro’s archives because her dissertation discusses McCarthy’s book The Road and Ishiguro’s book Never Let Me Go. Fortunately, the two archives were only 45 minutes away from each other, allowing Latimer to navigate between both spaces during the trip.

Latimer’s academic interest in this research area is derived from a passion with dystopian literature, particularly because of the way it engages with society, culture, and politics and how it applies to the real world.

Her favorite part of the research trip was seeing the authors’ commentary, first drafts, and editorial notes.  Latimer felt a personal connection with their literature, and she believes that it helped create a different understanding of the author than if she had read a formal interview or literature by the authors. It was also through this experience that Latimer says her writing confidence grew, even the way in which she viewed her work was elevated from the trip.  

Latimer hopes that her dissertation will provide a better understanding of the world. She says, “Dystopian literature engages with socioeconomics, politics, religion, and culture at large. It can provide warnings about potential dangers to society.” She adds, “It can also perpetuate stereotypes so she hopes those who are reading her dissertation will think a little bit more carefully about the world in which we live.”

The Dissertation Travel Award is only possible through the support of library donors. To support scholars like Shana, give to the Library Research Award Fund (020061).

Article written in collaboration with Tess Havash

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Upcoming panel discussion will usher in a new library exhibit titled: Out in the Archives

Members of ACT UP demonstrating at the Olympics Out of Cobb Protest at Woodruff Park, Atlanta, February 27, 1994 (Atlanta Journal Constitution)

Atlanta native Pat Hussain helped to establish the city’s first GLAAD chapter, and while working for the Gay and Lesbian Task Force, she helped to organize the first March on Washington. She served as the first co-director of Southerners on New Ground (SONG), and, responding to local anti-gay legislation, she co-founded Olympics Out of Cobb County. Along with Cobb Citizens Coalition, OOCC successfully protested to have the 1996 women’s Olympic volleyball competition moved out of Cobb.

Pat, alongside Julie Rhoad and Andrew Wood will make up the opening reception panel happening on Tuesday, October 8, at 4:00pm in the library’s Special Collections And Archives.

The exhibit highlights the history of Atlanta’s LGBT+ communities through the records, photographs, artifacts and oral histories preserved in the University’s Gender and Sexuality Collections. 

Prior to joining The NAMES Project Foundation, Julie Rhoad enjoyed a successful career as a creative director, producer, and owner of Candler Creative, Inc., a firm providing innovations in communications strategy, and special event planning. She was also instrumental in bringing the Lesbian and Gay Welcome Center to Atlanta during the 1996 Olympic Games. Julie joined the NAMES project in 2002, and has served as its President and CEO since that time.

As an original member of The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence in San Francisco, Andrew Wood learned the value of guerilla street theater and art. After returning to Atlanta he helped to found the local chapter of Act/Up, using his skills as a graphic designer and agitator to forward the cause. Today he volunteers for local animal rescues and travels around the state photographing our vanishing rural heritage. Most recently, he appeared in a commercial for Grady’s Ponce Center, one of our country’s leading facilities for treating HIV+ individuals.

This Event is free and open to the public.

Tuesday, October 8, 2019, 4:00-7:00 pm
Special Collections And Archives
University Library South, 8th Floor
100 Decatur St. SE
Atlanta, GA 30303
Parking is located in G-Deck on the GSU Atlanta Campus
Directions: https://library.gsu.edu/about/visit-the-library/

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Doctoral student Lashonda Slaughter-Wilson uses the Dissertation Library Travel award to study a 16th century manuscript held in Washington D.C.

Doctoral student Lashonda Slaughter-Wilson researches a 16th century guide on witchcraft

Lashonda Slaughter-Wilson, a Ph.D. ABD (all but dissertation) Candidate in the Department of History at Georgia State University, was awarded with Georgia State University’s Dissertation Library Travel Award.

The award grants doctoral students with financial assistance to support their research travel. With this award, Slaughter-Wilson travelled to Washington D.C. to visit the Folger Shakespeare Library, where she spent four days conducting research for her dissertation.

Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C where Slaughter-Wilson conduced her research; the inlays are famous scenes from Shakespeare plays

Slaughter-Wilson’s dissertation focuses on the book Daemonologie, a guide on hunting witches written by King James VI in the 1500s. She was driven to this topic because of her interest in King James VI and how his beliefs on witchcraft influenced Scottish and English society. Slaughter-Wilson hopes the takeaway from her dissertation is that words carry weight, especially when the words come from an authoritative person, and can shift important aspects of a society, such as laws and religion.

Scribal manuscript copy of King James VI of Scotland’s publication titles Daemonologie

Slaughter-Wilson spent four days researching the text in the Folger Shakespeare Library’s Reading Room,. Her favorite part of the trip was touching the Daemonologie manuscript and reading all of King James’ marginalia, handwritten notes in the margin that appear throughout the text.

Her previous research trips included visiting archives in England and Scotland, where she found original printed copies of Daemonologie and other archival records related to witch hunts. It was there that she learned the Folger Shakespeare Library holds the scribal manuscript of Daemonologie. When Slaughter-Wilson returned home from Europe, she received an email about the dissertation library travel award from her department. She applied for the award in hopes of visiting Washington D.C. to access Daemonologie.

A handwritten note by King James VI pointing out changes to the scribal text

Slaughter-Wilson’s advice for students who are thinking of applying for the dissertation library travel award is to just do it. When she applied for this award, she did not think she would get it. Not only did Slaughter-Wilson receive the award, but she was also able to pay for nearly the entire trip with the award money. She also recommends that students be clear about their research and show their passion for the topic.

To apply for the Dissertation Library Travel Award, visit https://graduate.gsu.edu/dissertation-library-travel-awards/. Award students will receive $500 for domestic travel and $1,000 for international travel.

The Dissertation Travel Award is only possible through the support of library donors. To support scholars like Lashonda, give to the Library Research Award Fund (020061).

Article written in collaboration with Tess Havash

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Evening workshops help the library meet the needs of students working full time

(Come do Data After Dark with us!)

The Library’s Research Data Services Team offers the majority of our workshops during daytime hours. But we occasionally get feedback like the following:

“I work full-time during the day and can only come to campus after I get off work — do you ever have workshops at night?”

“My classes during the day conflict with when you have your workshops — do you have any at night?”

Since we try to meet all of our campus researchers’ needs to our best ability, we now offer workshops in the evenings. They begin at either 6:30pm or 7:00pm to give people time to grab some dinner, hop in their chosen transit mode, and get through Atlanta traffic. So…

Come do Data After Dark with us!

Data After Dark workshops, Fall 2019

The calendar postings with dates, times, and details are linked below.

STATA After Dark

Stata 1: Introduction to Stata
Stata 2: Basic Data Analysis
Stata 3: Advanced Data Analysis
NETWORKS After Dark

Networks 1: General Overview of Social Networks and Social Network Analysis
Networks 2: Analyzing Sociocentric Networks with Stata
Networks 3: Social Network Instrument Development and Data Collection
SURVEY DESIGN After Dark

Survey Design 1: General Overview of Survey Design
Survey Design 2: Generating and Designing Paper Surveys
Survey Design 3: Generating and Designing Online Surveys with Qualtrics
SPSS After Dark

SPSS 1: Getting Started
SPSS 2: Analyzing Data
SPSS 3: Basic Coding in SPSS
NVIVO After Dark

NVivo 1 for Windows: Getting Started
NVivo 2 for Windows: Exploring Your Data
SAS After Dark

SAS 1: Introduction to SAS
SAS 2: Data Editing and Cleaning
MIXED METHODS After Dark

Mixed Methods: General Overview of Mixed Methods Research Design
TABLEAU After Dark

Tableau 1: Getting Started with Data Visualization
Tableau 2: Data Visualization Beyond the Basics
LOGISTIC REGRESSION After Dark

Logistic Regression: Logistic Regression using Stata
MAPPING DATA After Dark

Mapping Census Data with Social Explorer
R After Dark

R 1: Introduction to R
R 2: Basic Data Analysis in R
MARKETING DATA After Dark

Marketing Data: Consumers, Products, and Brands
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Get RDS@GSU Data Certified!

The Georgia State University Library’s Research Data Services (RDS) Team offers a wide variety of workshops on data analysis tools & methods, mapping & data visualization, finding data & statistics, and survey design. This Fall 2019 semester the RDS Team is offering 66 workshops — the most offerings we’ve had in a single semester to date. We’re even offering some evening workshops this semester to better accommodate campus researchers’ needs.

Why should you attend the Research Data Services (RDS) Team’s data workshops?

Data skills — even just basic data skills — are highly valued by today’s employers — being called “the most lucrative skill[s] to have” and “the most valuable skill[s] you can learn.” So, attending our data workshops will give you a leg up once you’re out there looking for a job.

Best of all, our data workshops are all free.

You may be thinking, “So what if they’re free?” Well, we researched how much workshops on our various topics would cost out in the real-world market, and what we found may make you re-think that “so what” reaction:

  • You could expect to pay $110 on average for a 1.5-hour workshop (the typical length of our workshops).
  • You could pay as low as $61/1.5-hour workshop, or as high as $200/1.5-hour workshop.
  • So, the 66 workshops that the RDS Team is offering for *FREE* in this Fall 2019 semester equates to an average $10,890 total cost at the market price, and it could range from $6,039 to $19,800 in total cost.

In other words, our free workshops are clearly quite a bargain and something you should be taking advantage of while you can…

Need even more incentive to come to our data workshops?

Okay, how about this for an incentive:

You can get RDS@GSU Data Certified!

  • Learn about our various Research Data Services (RDS) workshops on data analysis tools/softwaredata analysis methodsdata visualization and mapping, and finding data.
  • See the Library Calendar for RDS workshops — look for the logo with the GET DATA CERTIFIED seal (see image at left).
  • Attend a minimum of five unique RDS workshops in a semester.
    • Make sure you sign-in on the paper sign-in sheet at the workshop so we can track your attendance.
    • Going forward in 2019, we will count Summer and Fall semesters together, then Spring semester on its own.
    • While you’re welcome to attend the same workshop multiple times to hone your skills, to earn the data certificate you need to attend a minimum of five *unique* workshops (i.e., if you take Stata 1 twice, it can only count once toward your five workshops — but if you take Stata 1, Stata 2, and Stata 3, those count as three workshops toward the five needed for the certification).
    • Attending a Data in the ATL talk *does not* count as a workshop toward the certificate.
  • If you’ve attended a minimum five unique RDS workshops, you’ll be invited to a ceremony where you can mingle with others committed to getting RDS@GSU Data Certified *and* receive a custom certificate signed by our Dean of Libraries and the Leader of the Research Data Services Team (see example below). 
    • All certificate awardees will also receive a PDF version of the certificate via email.

Yes, it’s that easy! And by getting RDS@GSU Data Certified, you demonstrate to potential employers that you are committed to growing the data skills that they look for in hires. Last year, we awarded 92 certificates — learn more about those 92 inaugural RDS@GSU Data Certificate awardees! And here is what some of the RDS@GSU Data Certificate awardees had to say about the experience:

The certificate is a great opportunity to become a more competitive candidate while applying for a job. The workshops were very interactive.

I thought the RDS@GSU Data Certification incentivized my participation in the RDS workshops. The workshops themselves were great and it definitely helped me brush up on prior skills and knowledge.

Certification looks amazing on resumes, I also found what was covered useful to my practice of SAS & SPSS.

It is essential for me as a student majoring in Epidemiology. I will be involved in research, and the only way to answer some of the world’s health problems is making sense out of data. I’m confident this certificate will prove useful for me in getting a job. The entire program is flexible, and the materials are very helpful in understanding the course content.

So, get RDS@GSU Data Certified! It’s free, and it’s worth it.

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David St. John hopes to propose a new way of looking at the environment through the lens of traffic.

The University Library award aided St. John’s travel to Hong Kong Island to conduct research on human trafficking for his dissertation

David St. John, a Ph.D. Candidate in English Literature at Georgia State University, was awarded a Georgia State University Dissertation Library Travel Award.

The award, which grants doctoral students with financial assistance to support their research travel, aided St. John’s travel to Hong Kong Island to conduct research on human trafficking for his dissertation. St. John’s research focuses on the concept of traffic.  He has devoted time to researching automobile traffic, drug trafficking, and human trafficking.  St. John hopes to propose a new way of looking at the environment through the lens of traffic.

Hong Kong International Airport, also known as Chek Lap Kok Airport
Hong Kong International Airport, also known as Chek Lap Kok Airport

While in Hong Kong, St. John conducted research with the University of Hong Kong, the city library, and the Po Leung Kuk Museum.

Po Leung Kuk started as a community organization in 1878 during a time when abduction and trafficking of women and children were prevalent in Hong Kong. The organization was created to rescue the kidnapped victims. “Po Leung” translates to protection of the young and the innocent and was originally called Society for the Protection of Women and Children. Today, Po Leung Kuk serves as a charitable organization, a school, and a museum.  While St. John hopes to use his research to propose a new way of looking at the environment through the lens of traffic, he is very clear on the benefit of being able to conduct this portion of his research in Hong Kong.

He says, “Being able to have knowledge of the stories of another culture or history of another culture is vital to understanding how we can live in a world that’s globalizing without trying to assimilate everybody into one big mass of people.”

Front gate of Po Leung Kuk, where St. John conducted most of his research
Front gate of Po Leung Kuk, where St. John conducted most of his research

This award has impacted St. John both professionally and personally. Professionally, St. John says Hong Kong was a wonderful place for his research, and through his extensive research there, he feels he has grown as a scholar and professional researcher. Additionally, St. John believes the award also helped his future career goals. “My research in Hong Kong directly led to the paper I presented at the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment in early July,” St. John says. “My conference paper laid the groundwork for a chapter of my dissertation.”

On a personal level, St. John says, “I feel more confident in my ability to travel and the ability to take what’s outside, what’s happening in the world and apply it to literature.”

St. John advises students who are thinking of applying for the dissertation library travel award to just go for it. He believes research trips are just as crucial to a dissertation paper as the primary texts. He says, “There’s no reason not to. I did not think I was going to get this award, but I did. So, if I can get it, you can probably get it.”

The Dissertation Travel Award is only possible through the support of library donors. To support scholars like David, give to the Library Research Award Fund (020061)

Article written in collaboration with Tess Havash

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New for you: Portable DVD players!

Here’s a fact: The Library has a vast collection of movies and television on DVD, with most titles available to borrow for up to a week at a time. We’re talking cinema classics, foreign films, indie favorites, documentaries, and more–some of which you can’t find on any streaming platform!

Here’s another fact: many students (and even many professors) don’t own DVD players nowadays.

“So,” you might be thinking, “how are us DVD-player-less folks supposed to watch all this cool stuff?” Well, the Atlanta library now has 5 portable, multi-format, region-free DVD players you can borrow that are perfect for watching all the wonderful films and programs the Library has to offer. Watch what you want, wherever you want!


Here’s what one of the new player looks like. (BTW: Finding Nemo is one of the many movies we have on DVD!)

The details: DVD players can be borrowed for up to 1 week–conveniently, the same amount of time you can borrow our DVDs–and can play discs of any format (PAL or NTSC) and any region. They all have a 4-hour rechargeable battery, a 9″ swivel screen, and A/V outputs in case you want to connect the player to a larger screen. Don’t return it late! Overdue fines are set at $5 per day.

Could borrowing DVDs from the Library become the new “Netflix and chill???” Maybe. Happy watching!

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