Meet a Librarian: Ida Martinez

photo of Ida Martinez

Meet Ida…

Who is Ida?

Ida is the subject librarian for Psychology and also the library’s liaison to the Honors College and the Global Studies program. She supports research in these areas through consultations and instruction. She particularly enjoys the outreach aspect of her liaison duties. The more people from her departments that she gets to meet and help, the better, so Ida makes a lot of efforts to reach out and communicate what a great place the GSU Library is, and how she can help them navigate our services and collections.

What has Ida studied? Where is she from?

Ida holds a BA in Psychology from the University of Notre Dame, and a MLIS from Dominican University.

Ida was raised in El Paso, Texas; since leaving home at 18, she has lived in Indiana, New Mexico, Illinois, New York, and now in Georgia. Librarianship was a career change for Ida, who spent close to 12 years working in university student services, such as admissions and academic advising. She has been a subject specialist librarian since 2002, and has supported areas including Latino Studies, Education, and Psychology.

What does Ida like to do?

Outside of librarianship Ida volunteers her time to caring for homeless cats through a no-kill shelter in northeast Atlanta that has been around since 2002. Ida has been volunteering with them since 2011, concentrating mostly on their senior special-needs room which houses cats that are considered “sanctuary” cats (i.e., unadoptable). The work involves mostly cleaning, but also offering affection and playtime for cats that are overlooked. In the past 5 years, she has fostered about 10 cats from the shelter so that they can live out their last few weeks, or months, or years in a loving home. Currently, six senior special-needs cats from the shelter are living out their golden years with Ida. She has a particularly special bond with a 14-year-old samurai kitty from Japan named Musashi.

samurai cat named Musashi

… and meet Musashi!

It’s not all cats for Ida. She also does a lot of reading, and tries to do the majority of PopSugar’s annual reading challenge. She gets to read a lot of genres that she normally would not venture into, like “Nordic noir.” She does everything possible to regularly visit her siblings in Chicago (she went four times last year). And, Ida does a lot of the logistics involved in preparing for and traveling to cities that host marathons (her husband is the runner; she is his de facto manager). There’s a lot that goes into managing a marathon maniac.

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June 2018 GLBT Book Month – and Archives, Too!

GLBT Book Month, American Library Association, below a book with rainbow pagesJune is the American Library Association’s GLBT Book Month, a nationwide celebration of the authors and writings that reflect the lives and experiences of the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender community.

Since 2011, the University Library’s Special Collections and Archives has been documenting LGBT+ life in Georgia and the South with its Gender & Sexuality Collections. The collections are comprised of personal papers, records of organizations, photographs, textiles, artifacts, books and periodicals, video and sound recordings, and oral history interviews.

Among our holdings are the very recently digitized Michael B. Maloney Collection of Out TV Atlanta Video Recordings. Out TV Atlanta, a half-hour weekly news and entertainment show, ran from 1999-2000. The brainchild of Michael B. Maloney, the show was supported financially by family and friends. Maloney used his funds to purchase air time, and Out TV aired in Atlanta and Savannah. As producer of the show, Maloney saw that most of the coverage of LGBTQ life involved night clubs and drag queens, and he wanted to focus on “ordinary” gay people who were fire fighters, attorneys, and regular members of the community.

In 2016, Maloney was introduced to GSU’s Special Collections by Ryan Roemerman, Executive Director of the Center for Civil and Human Rights’ LGBT Institute. The official records of the Institute live in the Gender & Sexuality Collections, and the Institute also directs donors who wish to place their collections in a local repository. Digitization of Maloney’s 252 digital videos was made possible by the Digital Libraries of Georgia Subgrants Award Program, and with the very prompt services of Preserve South, Inc. The digital content is currently being prepared for access by our colleagues in the Library’s Digital Projects Unit. Over the next few weeks and months, videos will be indexed and made available in a playlist via the Library’s YouTube channel.

 

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June 2018 GLBT Book Month: Searching the Catalog for Books

GLBT Book Month, American Library Association, below a book with rainbow pagesHave you ever looked up a book in the library catalog and checked out the “Details” section for that book? Looking at a book’s “Details” will point you towards citation information for a book, but it will also point you to a list of “Subjects” related to that book. These “Subjects” are usually links that will take you to other books “about” that particular subject in the library’s catalog.

Libraries and librarians use subject terms to help describe resources. They are part of what librarians call a “controlled vocabulary”—they aren’t 100% hard and fast terms, since terminology changes over time, but they are set, agreed-upon terms that follow particular patterns. Most college and university libraries in the United States and even some libraries worldwide use the Library of Congress Subject Headings, established by the Library of Congress. Once you begin identifying useful subject terms and using them to search the catalog, you will get results that bring together books that have all been identified as being “about” that subject. Because there are variations, it’s always good to look at a book’s subject terms to see what other terms were used to categorize the book—which helps you find more search terms that can help you find more resources.

There are two ways to search by “subject” in the library’s catalog:

  • Click on “Browse Search” on the “Catalog” tab. The default Browse option is “Browse by subject,” which allows you to type in a keyword or subject term and be directed to relevant subject terms.
  • Click on “Advanced Search” and select “Subject” in an “Any Field” dropdown menu.

Examples of useful subject terms to help you search for materials relating to LGBTQ+ studies:

  • Queer theory
  • Homosexuality
  • Lesbians
  • Gays — Identity
  • Gay Teachers (try also with other occupational categories)
  • African American Gays (notice that the category is African American Gays, not Gay African Americans… hmm…)
  • Bisexuality
  • Transgender
  • Intersex
  • Sexual orientation
  • Queer
  • Gay Rights
  • Female impersonators (interestingly, not Drag queens… hmm…)

You can also try “subject” searches on names, places, and even events to help narrow your searching if needed:

  • Mock, Janet, 1983-
  • Milk, Harvey
  • Stonewall Riots, New York, N.Y., 1969
  • Divine, 1945-1988

Because subject terms are created—and assigned—according to the intellectual currents of when the specific book was cataloged, there can be gaps and lags between a community’s usage of terms and the assignment/creation of LC Subject Headings. Doing a Browse Search by subject for Homosexuals will turn up lists up related subject terms, one for homosexuals not specified by gender, one for “Homosexuals, Female” and one for “Homosexuals, Male.” Doing a Browse Search by subject for Nonbinary (or Nonbinary Gender) will turn up a list of related subject terms as well, beginning with Gender nonconformity.

Cataloging librarians can propose changes in the LC Subject Headings; these have to go through an approved process and the process can be contentious. (For example, the Library of Congress still uses the subject term “Illegal Aliens” in spite of librarians’ pressure to switch to a term like “Noncitizen” or “Undocumented Immigrant.” For more on this story, click here). But these interventions can also be successful. As of 2016, Asexuality (Sexual Orientation) and Asexual People are now official LC Subject Terms. (If you’re curious about the journey those two headings took, click here for more information)

cover, Melissa Adler, Cruising the LibraryMelissa Adler’s fascinating book Cruising the Library: Perversities in the Organization of Knowledge (2017) offers an in-depth discussion of the evolution (some might say devolution?) of terms relating to expanding sexualities within the Library of Congress Subject Headings.

Questions on how to find books and other resources related to LGBTQ+ topics? See our LGBTQ+ Studies research guide, or ask a librarian!

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June 2018 GLBT Book Month – and Films, Too!

GLBT Book Month, American Library Association, below a book with rainbow pagesJune is the American Library Association’s GLBT Book Month, a nationwide celebration of the authors and writings that reflect the lives and experiences of the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender community.

LGBTQ+ Films @ the University Library

The University Library has hundreds of LGBTQ+ feature films, documentaries, and TV Series either streaming or on DVD – check out this Google doc for details.

Books about LGBTQ+ Films @ the University Library

The University Library also has many books studying LGBTQ+ cinema – here are just a few:

Other LGBTQ+ Resources @ the University Library

Check out the LGBTQ+ Studies guide – your gateway to the many resources the University Library has to offer: http://research.library.gsu.edu/lgbtqiq 

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Zotero workshops June 20 & 27

We’re offering two workshops on the bibliography software Zotero this summer — one in person and one online.

Zotero is a program that makes it easy to save citations and automatically create bibliographies in Word.

It’s easy to use and free. For more information about Zotero, see our Zotero guide or the Zotero home page.

Wednesday, June 20, 2018Classroom 1 (next to Saxby’s coffee shop), Library North, 10-11am.

Registration encouraged but walk-ins welcome. Feel free to bring your own laptop (system requirements: Firefox, Chrome or Safari web browser, any operating system) or use our classroom computers.

Register for June 20 Zotero workshop

Wednesday, June 27, 2018: Online via Webex (system requirements: Firefox, Chrome or Safari web browser, any operating system, headphones or speakers. You don’t need a microphone).

Register for June 27 online Zotero workshop

Email Jason Puckett at jpuckett@gsu.edu with any questions.

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University Library Co-hosting Code4Lib Southeast Conference

On July 27th, 2018, Georgia State University Library and the Atlanta University Center Robert W. Woodruff Library are co-hosting the annual Code4Lib Southeast Conference. We invite anyone interested in the latest uses of technology in libraries and related fields to attend or present at the conference. Code4Lib conferences go beyond topics about code and libraries. It’s for anyone who works with “technology stuff” in libraries, archives, museums, or related areas. Code4Lib Southeast aims to foster collaboration across the southeast region.

Conference Information
AUC Library, 111 James P. Brawley Drive SW, Atlanta, GA
10:00am to 4:00pm, July 27th, 2018
Cost: Free! Lunch and coffee provided
Registration Deadline is July 6, 2018
Proposal Deadline is June 22, 2018

Present at Code4LibSE
The Call for Proposals is currently open to the following presentations:

  • Presentations (20-minute talk, 5-minute Q&A)
  • Lightning talks (5-minute talk, 2-minute Q&A)
  • Breakout discussions or workshops (25 minutes)
  • Interactive poster presentations and project demos (during lunch)

Use the online proposal form to submit your proposal.

Attend Code4LibSE
Registration for the conference is open and filling up quickly—don’t wait to secure your spot at the conference! The conference registration is limited to 90 people, and lunch and morning/afternoon coffee will be provided.

If you’re traveling and plan to stay overnight, the Code4Lib Southeast 2018 conference page includes information about local hotels and restaurants.

You don’t have to be from the Southeast to attend the conference or present.

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2018 Student Survey: Power Outlets

At the end of February 2018, the University Library administered a survey to a random sample of 5,000 Georgia State students currently enrolled at all campuses. This post is one in a series that highlights a survey trend and the library’s response. We welcome your feedback anytime.

Student in the library using a laptop wearing headphonesWhenever the library solicits feedback from students, we can expect to get a ton of requests for more electrical outlets. The spring survey was no exception! You need more places to plug in. The library has responded to this need as funding and space allow. The last time we added outlets was in 2016, when the Atlanta library installed outlets (along with new seating areas) to Library South 4 and Library North 3, 4, and 5.

Just before we administered the 2018 spring survey, an undergraduate student requested a meeting with the Associate Dean for Public Services with the intent of discussing the need for additional outlets. This meeting resulted in a walking tour of the Atlanta library, with the student suggesting new outlet locations. This combination of survey feedback and the student meeting has resulted in a plan for additional outlets at the individual study carrels and group study tables on Library North 3, 4, and 5. Look for the outlets—paid for with your Library Fee funds—at the beginning of fall semester 2018.

Check out the complete survey summary report for more details.

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2018 Student Survey: Library Spaces

At the end of February 2018, the University Library administered a survey to a random sample of 5,000 Georgia State students currently enrolled at all campuses. This post is one in a series that highlights a survey trend and the library’s response. We welcome your feedback anytime.

A major theme in the survey results was space: Students want more space generally, more quiet spaces, and more spaces for individual and group study. Each campus library was constructed with a particular student population in mind, and with continued population growth on each campus, the libraries feel crowded. In January 2018, we rolled out a master plan for the Atlanta Campus Library, Library Reimagined. In the near term, the Atlanta campus library will realize additional space, in addition to a new entrance from the “greenway,” by converting the parking area under Library North into a new flexible learning space. Longer-term plans include more group study rooms, more natural light, a graduate student center, and better access to the expertise of librarians. We recognize the need for more library space at Alpharetta and are examining ways to accomplish this. We are looking for ways to rethink underused space in the Clarkston library and are partnering with Technology Services to offer a makerspace in the Dunwoody library. As we compile ideas and prepare our next steps, we would love to hear your thoughts and suggestions related to the library master plan.

Check out the complete survey summary report for more details.

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Library Employees Earn Degrees

Library personnel are constantly striving to serve the needs of the GSU community through personal and professional development. Today we celebrate several of our own who have pursued and attained additional degrees while also working at the downtown campus University Library. Congratulations to the following people on their graduations this spring:

Library technical assistant O’Neilia Francis earned her Bachelor of Science in Information Technology from Kennesaw State University. O’Neilia works for the library’s User Services & Technology Support department, so you might see her helping patrons at the service desks on the first and second floors.

Policy studies librarian La Loria Konata earned her Juris Master degree in Intellectual Property from Emory University School of Law. Her legal studies supplement her subject work with Criminal Justice, Economics, Public Management & Policy, and Social Work. Read La Loria’s “Meet a Librarian” profile here.

La Loria Konata at orientation and graduation.

Library assistant Dana Marseille earned her Master of Library and Information Science degree from Valdosta State University. Dana works with the library’s electronic reserves collection and provides technology, circulation, and reference assistance for patrons at both public service desks.

Dana Marseille at her MLIS graduation ceremony.

Our new Quantitative Data Specialist Dr. Raeda Anderson earned her Doctorate of Philosophy in Sociology with a minor in Survey Research and Methodology from The University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her knowledge and skills facilitate the development and implementation of quantitative research methods used by faculty, staff, and students within the social sciences.

Raeda Anderson in doctoral regalia.

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June 2018: GLBT Book Month

GLBT Book Month, American Library Association, below a book with rainbow pages

June is the American Library Association’s GLBT Book Month, a nationwide celebration of the authors and writings that reflect the lives and experiences of the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender community.

Each week this month, one of our librarians or archivists will post about library resources for researchers and readers in the GSU community who want to dig into our rich and diverse GLBT collections.

A few of the recommended GLBT book titles you’ll find in the Library’s collection:

GSU Library is proud to support GLBT research and reading this month and every month.

For more titles, visit:

Stonewall Book Awards List

2018 Rainbow Book List

2018 Over the Rainbow Book List

 

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