New Faculty Publication: Caregiving and Care Sharing

Nancy KropfSocial Work Professor Nancy Kropf and next Dean of the Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions, has co-authored a new book, Caregiving and Care Sharing: A Life Course Perspective with Dr. Roberta Green, Emerita Faculty from the University of Texas Austin. “In Caregiving and Care Sharing: A Life Course Perspective, the authors highlight the experience of providing care in several different family situations. This book not only serves as a guide to assist those caring for older adults, but also examines the experiences of older caregivers caring for younger adults, as older parents care for adult children with intellectual and psychiatric conditions, or when grandparents are raising their grandchildren. The caregiving needs of veterans are also addressed.” (From the Publisher’s website)

Other works by Kropf include:

Beck, Elizabeth, Terri Lewinson, and Nancy P. Kropf. “Restorative Justice With Older Adults: Mediating Trauma And Conflict In Later Life.” Traumatology (2015).

Kropf, Nancy P., and Barbara L. Jones. 2014. “When Public Tragedies Happen: Community Practice Approaches in Grief, Loss, and Recovery.” Journal Of Community Practice 22, no. 3: 281-298.

Lee, Minhong, and Nancy P. Kropf. 2013. “The Capacity Evaluation Screen-Social Work (CES-SW): Development of a Brief Instrument.” Journal Of Social Service Research 39, no. 4: 521-529.

Greene, Roberta R., and Nancy P. Kropf. 2011. Competence : theoretical frameworks. New Brunswick, N.J. : AldineTransaction.

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Posted in Books, Faculty Publications and Research, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, Gerontology, Nursing, Social Work | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

New Resource: AmericasBarometer

AmericasBarometerThe GSU community now has access to AmericasBarometer, a comparative survey that measures values, behaviors, and socio-economic conditions in the Americas using national probability samples of voting-age adults.

A creation of the Latin American Public Opinion Project (LAPOP) at Vanderbilt University, AmericasBarometer is the only scientifically rigorous comparative survey that covers 28 nations including all of North, Central, and South America, as well as a significant number of countries in the Caribbean. Each year it publishes dozens of high quality academic studies and policy-relevant papers. Standardization of methods across the national surveys and a common core questionnaire permits valid comparisons across countries and time, allowing the AmericasBarometer to serve as a valid “barometer” of levels and shifts in individual opinions and behaviors. Stratified sample designs permit complex analyses of individuals nested within sub-regions. In addition to a common core, individual questionnaires contain country-specific modules that allow experts to assess topics of particular relevance to the country. The surveys are developed with input from academics, policymakers and others with a stake in democracy. 

You can access the resource from the Library’s Databases by Name A-Z page (or click the image or link above). Be sure to accept the user agreement before using.

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Posted in Databases, General News, New Resources, Political Science | 1 Comment

New Digital Collection: Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA)

MARTA0075_320

Cover of 1968 Preliminary Plans of Rapid Transit System

Digital Library Services is pleased to announce the publication of a new digital collection: the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) Collection. GSU Library has partnered with the transit agency to digitize these rare items, which include transit station area development plans, publications showing the effects of transit development on Atlanta communities, and a selection of historical maps and other publications. Notably, the collection includes a large number of

Preliminary plan for Airport transit station, 1971

Preliminary plan for Airport transit station, 1971

maps from three sets of preliminary plans for rapid transit system development, issued in March 1968, October 1968, and in 1971. The maps include plans for multiple train lines, some of which were never constructed.

Digital Library Services plans to add to this collection in the near future by digitizing MARTA-related materials from the library’s Southern Labor Archives and Archives for Research on Women and Gender. Check this blog for updates.

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Posted in Digital Collections, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, Primary Resources | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

New Faculty Publication: Evolution of Strategic HRM

Bruce KaufmanBruce Kaufman, Professor in the Economics department at Georgia State University recently published an article, “Evolution Of Strategic HRM As Seen Through Two Founding Books: A 30th Anniversary Perspective On Development Of The Field,Human Resource Management 54.3 (2015): 389-407. From the abstract:

Two pioneering books published in 1984 arguably launched the field of strategic human resource management (SHRM). The first is Strategic Human Resource Management by Fombrun, Tichy, and Devanna; the second is Managing Human Assets by Beer, Spector, Lawrence, Mills, and Walton. This article provides a 30th anniversary review of the two books, partly to honor their pioneering contributions but also to use them as a lens for examining how the field has subsequently evolved and developed. Two recently published SHRM books [Short Introduction to Strategic Human Resource Management (Cascio and Boudreau) and HRM and Performance: Achievements and Challenges (Paauwe, Guest and Wright)] are used as a benchmark for this analysis. The review identifies areas of SHRM constancy and change, major theoretical and empirical innovations, and newly developed research questions and directions, largely in an American context. Diagrammatic models of SHRM are synthesized and compared from the four books; also, nine specific dimensions of evolution in the field are highlighted with discussion of advances and shortcomings.

Other recent works by Professor Kaufman include:

Kaufman, Bruce E. “Market Competition, HRM, And Firm Performance: The Conventional Paradigm Critiqued And Reformulated.” Human Resource Management Review 25.1 (2015): 107-125.

Kaufman, Bruce E. “The Historical Development Of American HRM Broadly Viewed.Human Resource Management Review 24.3 (2014): 196-218.

Kaufman, Bruce E. “Theorising Determinants Of Employee Voice: An Integrative Model Across Disciplines And Levels Of Analysis.” Human Resource Management Journal 25.1 (2015): 19.

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Posted in Economics, Faculty Publications and Research, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, Management, Public Management & Policy, Publications and Research | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

New Resource: PolicyMap

With the growing importance of geospatial technology and geographic datasets across all disciplines, the University Library is pleased to offer the Georgia State University community access to PolicyMap. PolicyMap is one of the largest collections of US public geodatasets and includes data from US agencies such as the US Census Department, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Internal Revenue Service, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Department of Health and Human Services, and much more. This large selection of data is accessible from one interface, can be downloaded, and easily mapped. And with PolicyMap’s online mapping feature, users can create custom regions (i.e. custom geographies) and can upload their own datasets.

To learn more about this new resource, see the introduction video below or view the many tutorials available from PolicyMap.

PolicyMap

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Posted in African American Studies, Anthropology, Applied Linguistics and ESL, Business, Communication, Criminal Justice, Databases, Economics, Education, Educational Policy Studies, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, Geosciences, Government Information, Journalism, Marketing, New Resources, Nursing, Nutrition, Political Science, Psychology, Public Health, Public Management & Policy, Real Estate, Religious Studies, Resources, Risk Management & Insurance, Social Work, Sociology, Uncategorized, Women's Studies | 2 Comments

Observing Juneteenth

Audience at Juneteenth Celebration and Black Music Month, Atlanta, Georgia, June 20, 1993. Special Collections and Archives, Georgia State University Library.

Audience at Juneteenth Celebration and Black Music Month, Atlanta, Georgia, June 20, 1993. Special Collections and Archives, Georgia State University Library.

June 19 is also known as Juneteenth, the anniversary of the formal end of slavery in Texas, the last slaveholding state of the Confederacy. This year marks the 150th anniversary of Juneteenth.

Though technically slaves held in Confederate states had been freed by the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, in practical terms, many slaves were unable to avail themselves of this freedom. As slaveholders fled their land in the wake of Union victories, taking their slaves with them, slaves and slaveholders alike poured into the interior of Texas, largely isolated from most fighting and from Union attempts to occupy the state, which tended to be limited to the Texas coastlines. Texas was slaveholders’ last refuge, and its population include approximately 250,000 slaves. When Union forces entered Galveston on June 19, 1865, General Gordon Granger found it was necessary to issue a direct order notifying Texans that “all slaves are free.”

This was a mixed victory for the newly freed slaves, who, on the one hand, had finally been granted freedom, but who also faced increased violence. Nevertheless, “Juneteenth” was a cause for celebration in Texas throughout the nineteenth century and into the twentieth century. During the Great Migration, as African-Americans moved out of the South and across the country, Juneteenth traditions traveled with them. In 1979 Texas declared Juneteenth a state holiday, and in 1997 Congress recognized the day as Juneteenth Independence Day through Senate Joint Resolution 11 and House Joint Resolution 56.

For more information about Juneteenth, see:

cover image, Ralph Ellison, Juneteenth: A NovelRalph Ellison’s final novel, Juneteenth, published after his death, draws on this holiday for its title,

To learn about historical Juneteenth celebrations and events in Atlanta, try searching using the term “Juneteenth” in our historical Atlanta Daily World and Atlanta Constitution databases and in the Atlanta Historic Newspapers Archive.

Our African-American Studies research guide also includes many other resources for learning more about African-American history.

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Posted in African American Studies, Books, Databases, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, History, Primary Resources | Leave a comment

Journal Citation Reports: new interface and content

1

© 2015 THOMSON REUTERS

Journal Citation Reports, a product of Thomson Reuters, has recently added its yearly content update to the Social Science and Science editions and updated the interface to one that is visually appealing, user-friendly, and more consistent with the Web of Science interface.

2015 JCR Infographic

The 2015 Edition of JCR includes:

  • More than 11,000 of the world’s most highly cited, peer reviewed journal listings in 237 disciplines and 82 countries
  • 272 journals with their first Journal Impact Factor

The new interface now features…

  • a searchability option across Social Science and Science editions; previously 1 edition per search
  • a Visualization view
  • the ability to select journals for comparison by quartile or trends, and metrics such as impact factor and article influence score
  • searchability by impact factor range, open access journals, category schema (Web of Science or Essential Science Indicators
  • the option to download data, and set up custom reports

Other new indicators, as described by Thomson Reuters:

  • Understand journal performance across categories with the brand new Journal Impact Factor Percentile.
  • How many reviews does a non-review journal publish? The Percent Articles in Cited Items tracks the proportion of articles in non-review journals.
  • The Normalized Eignefactor now makes it even easier to understand influential journals in the research community. A Normalized Eigenfactor of 2 means a journal is twice as influential as other journals in the same pool.

Two free online sessions hosted by Thomson Reuters will be available this month for anyone interested in a demo:

Tuesday, June 25 at 11:00am (Eastern)

Monday, June 29 at 10:00am (Eastern)

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Posted in Databases, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, Publications and Research | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

CURVE Summer Upgrades

During the month of June, you will see a few enhancements happening in CURVE: Collaborative University Research & Visualization Environment located on the main floor of Library South.  Based on feedback over the last academic year, we are changing the furnishings and setup at the CURVE interactWall control console, 4K workstation, and Bloomberg/business research workstations to better facilitate group work and interaction. Most of CURVE is still open Monday-Thursday (9 a.m. – 5 p.m.) and Friday (9 a.m. – 4 p.m.). The only exception is the interactWall, which we plan to have back online sometime during the week of June 22-26.

It didn’t take long for students to discover our new and improved furniture…
CURVE students

Pictured here: biology majors from Dr. Carmen Eilertson’s Histology course (BIOL 4685) getting up-close with some “mucin-producing” cells at the 4K workstation.  Left to right: Lisa Phommaseng, Kimberly Shim, Rabiya Chand, Muhammad Anwar, and Ricky Ju getting in some visualization time and out of the heat outside.

For more information, visit the CURVE site at curve.gsu.edu

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Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Georgia State University receives NHPRC grant to digitize Uprising of ’34 footage

The documentary The Uprising of ’34, released in 1995, tells the story of the General Textile Strike of 1934. The strike, one of the largest in American history, was a defining moment in the South’s relationship to organized labor. The 88-minute documentary was distilled from over 200 hours of interviews with workers who participated in the strikes, their families, mill owners, and labor organizers. All 200-plus hours of interviews will soon be freely available online.

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission has awarded Georgia State

Image from the 1934 strike, courtesy of Atlanta History Center

Image from the 1934 strike, VIS 82.148.04, Kenneth Rogers Photographs, Kenan Research Center at the Atlanta History Center

University Library a grant in the amount of $121,418 to digitize and transcribe the recorded interviews. The interviews will be presented online alongside their transcripts using the Oral History Metadata Synchronizer (OHMS), an open-source software application developed at the University of Kentucky’s Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History. The interview tapes are held by the Library’s Southern Labor Archives. The project, which will begin August 1, is expected to take 18 months.

In 1934, textile workers at cotton mills in multiple states across the South and up the Eastern seaboard attempted to unionize in an effort to improve their working conditions. Unionization efforts in the South were deeply divisive, and anti-union sentiment flourished in many areas. The workers’ attempts to organize culminated in a strike that began in early September and lasted for 22 days. Nearly half a million workers walked off their jobs. Mill owners responded with force, and strikers were shot and killed in several Southern towns.

Workers who participated in the strike lost their jobs, and many were blacklisted from working in their small towns. The economic consequences of the strike were devastating, and helped to reinforce the anti-union sentiment that exists in many parts of the South even today. This project will make a collection of first-person accounts of the strike and its

Atlanta Constitution issue, published several days before the beginning of the strike. Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archives. Special Collections and Archives, Georgia State University Library.

Atlanta Constitution issue, published August 31, 1934, several days before the beginning of the strike. Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archives. Special Collections and Archives, Georgia State University Library.

aftermath widely available for the first time.

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), a statutory body affiliated with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), supports a wide range of activities to preserve, publish, and encourage the use of documentary sources, created in every medium ranging from quill pen to computer, relating to the history of the United States.

For more information, contact Kathryn Michaelis, Digital Projects Coordinator, Georgia State University Library, at (404) 413-2860 or kmichaelis@gsu.edu.

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Posted in Digital Collections, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, History, Oral Histories, Primary Resources, Special Collections & Archives | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Let the Fire Burn Documentary Screening this Wednesday

The Georgia State Greatest MINDS Society and other GSU groups are screening the documentary film, Let the Fire Burn, in the Student Center Speaker’s Auditorium this Wednesday, June 10, starting at 5:00pm and followed by a discussion led by GSU Sociology Professor Dr. Deirdre Oakley and GSU African-American Studies Professor Dr. Michael Simanga. A reception with food will follow the screening/discussion.

Let the Fire Burn describes the conflict between the Black Power group MOVE and the people and city government of Philadelphia, culminating in the armed standoff of May 13, 1985, in which one police officer and eleven MOVE members were killed, ending when Philadelphia police dropped a bomb on the row house that served as MOVE headquarters.” (from catalog record)

Also check out some of these GSU Library resources about MOVE and the incidents surrounding and resulting from that day in May:

The Let the Fire Burn DVD will also be available for check out at the GSU University Library once the screening is complete.

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Posted in African American Studies, Books, Ejournals, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, Sociology | 1 Comment