Argentina’s “Dirty War”

Have you ever thought about what it would be like to be put in prison by your government for expressing your opinion about a new law or protesting a change in state funding such as changes in the HOPE scholarship? The unrest in the Middle East in the last few weeks has opened the eyes of Americans to the lack of freedom in the rest of the world. Dr. Fernando Reati, Modern & Classical Languages Department Chair, has first hand experience of a government’s retaliation against its’ own people. A recent article in the GSU Magazine, Demons & Democracy relates his experience. The “Dirty War” was a period of state sponsored violence in Argentina from 1976 to 1983 when many citizens were unjustly imprisoned, tortured, and killed.

If you want to find out about Argentina’s “Dirty War” and those who disappeared, the library has resources to support research in history, film studies, and women’s studies. A few examples include “Postmemories of Terror: A New Generation Copes with the Legacy of the “Dirty War”, “Displaced Memories: The Poetics of Trauma in Agentine Women’s Writing”, and “Confronting the ‘Dirty War’ in Argentine Cinema, 1983-1993: Memory and Gender in Historical Representations”. You can also find articles on the “Dirty War” in GSU Library databases such as JSTOR, Film and Television Literature Index, and MLA International Bibliography.

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