National History Day @ GSU Library

This fall we are opening our doors to the National History Day community.  On October 6th and October 20th, Georgia State University Library is participating in NHD Georgia’s Research Roundup events.  National History Day is an academic program and competition which challenges middle and high school students to critically exam history.  This year’s theme is “Triumph & Tragedy in History.”  GSU’s Research Roundups are opportunities for budding historians to develop research skills and access the resources of a major research university library.

Last October, Georgia State welcomed nearly 100 social studies students and teachers from the DeKalb Early College Academy to our downtown library and archives.  DECA students participated in workshops with librarians and archivists.  Students were also given the opportunity to use GSU’s vast online resources on their own.

Students and teachers from DeKalb Early College Academy visit the Atlanta campus in October 2017.

This year, the library is broadening our reach and offering Research Roundup events at several campuses.  On October 6th, NHD students are welcome to visit our Dunwoody or Clarkston campus libraries.  Students can attend an orientation session where librarians will introduce library resources & discuss research strategies.  Students will then be able to use our collections, including extensive primary and secondary sources.  GSU librarians will be available to assist with research.  Space is limited to 35 students per campus.  For more details & to register for Roundups at Dunwoody or Clarkston see our registration form.

In addition, a limited number of NHD students can spend an afternoon at our Atlanta campus archives where they can explore the university’s unique collections.  Students will participate in a 90 minute workshop as an introduction to archival research.  After a break, the remaining time will be spent researching in the archives with assistance from GSU archivists.  Space is limited to 12 students.  This is an opportunity to do a truly unique NHD project.  For more details & to register for the Atlanta campus event see our registration form.

More information for students and teachers can be found on our National History Day Research Guide, including descriptions of GSU subscription resources available during the Roundups.

You can also contact Scott Pieper, the Reference & Instruction librarian coordinating GSU’s NHD program or Christina Zamon, Department Head of Special Collections & Archives.

We look forward to working with NHD students!

Scott Pieper is a Reference & Instruction Librarian at the Decatur Campus of GSU Library.  Scott’s research interests include pipeline to college programming and motivational theories applied to library learners.

Share
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (3 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...
Posted in Databases, History, Primary Resources, Special Collections & Archives | Leave a comment

“Mags, Bars & (Drag) Stars: A History of Atlanta’s Gay Bars and Community Magazines”

SAVE THE DATE! On Tuesday, October 2, Georgia State University Library’s Special Collections and Archives will host what promises to be a fun and informative event,  “Mags, Bars & (Drag) Stars: A History of Atlanta’s Gay Bars and Community Magazines.” Speakers Gregg Daugherty and Ashley Coleman Taylor will talk about the impact of gay publications and bars in building Atlanta’s LGBTQ communities.

This Event is free and open to the public.

Tuesday, October 2, 2018, 4:00-6:00 pm
Special Collections And Archives
University Library South, 8th Floor
100 Decatur St. SE
Atlanta, GA 30303

 

A native of Black Mountain, North Carolina, Gregg Daugherty moved to Atlanta in 1978. He managed advertising sales for Cruise Magazine, as well as many other local gay magazines, and he became intimate with the city’s arts scene through his work with the Academy Theatre’s marketing dept. He also was involved in promoting and publishing programs for many of Atlanta’s arts groups. An avid softball player, Gregg was very active in the Hotlanta Softball League as a player, coach, and two term league secretary, and while he played for the Armory Bar, he was also a member of the Armorettes, the nationally famous drag group that raised money and awareness for AIDS charities.

In 1988, Gregg opened his own business, Performing Arts Media, a playbill and program publishing company. He worked with the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games to produce programs for the Cultural Olympiad. Then, in 1999, he created Lighthouse Communications which published the Atlanta ShowGuide.  The ShowGuide continues to be distributed bimonthly throughout greater Atlanta.

Gregg became a member of GSU’s family of donors, when Ryan Roemerman, executive director of the Center for Civil and Human Rights’ LGBT Institute recommended that his papers would find a happy home within the Gender and Sexuality Collections. The LGBT Institute’s Gregg Daugherty Papers were donated to Special Collections in the Spring of 2018, and to date, Gregg has participated in four separate oral history interviews.

 

Ashley Coleman Taylor, Ph.D. is an Instructor of Women’s Studies at Agnes Scott College and formerly a Lecturer in the Institute for Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Georgia State University. As an interdisciplinary ethnographer, she specializes in the intersecting lived experiences of black embodiment, black genders and sexualities, and African diaspora religious experience. She was a 2016-2017 Visiting Fellow at the James Weldon Johnson Institute at Emory University where she prepared her book project, Magestad Negra: Race, Class, Gender and Religious Experience in the Puerto Rican Imaginary. The manuscript, a black feminist approach to race, gender and activism in Puerto Rico, is a finalist for the NWSA/University of Illinois Press First Book Prize. Her current project, Atlanta as Black Queer Place, is an archicval oral history project that centers the lived experiences of Atlanta-based LGBT activists and features qualitative geospatial methodologies.

The Society of Georgia Archivists’ “Spotlight on Archives” grant has made this event possible. The grant is intended to help archives, museums, or heritage institutions in Georgia promote public awareness of their archives and manuscript collections, by hosting a public event during the month of October, which is not only Georgia Archives Month, but also Atlanta’s Pride Month.

Share
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Take a library tour on your smartphone

Welcome back to the GSU Libraries! Want to learn your way around?

Use your smartphone and the free ActionBound app to take a tour of any of the GSU libraries. You’ll learn your way around the library buildings, and the basics of how to search for books and articles.

All you need is an Android or iOS device with GPS and a camera. Download ActionBound and search in the app for “GSU Library” to get started, or use one of the links below (we’ve included the ActionBound QR codes) to get started on your campus.

Contact librarians Jason Puckett or Karen Doster-Greenleaf for help. Thanks to Angie Dixon, Sarah Grace Glover, Dawn Williams, and Josh Yang for their help putting this together!

Share
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...
Posted in For Students | Leave a comment

You’ve got the power.

Atlanta Library North 3rd floor

At the end of February 2018, the University Library administered a survey to a random sample of 5,000 Georgia State students currently enrolled at all campuses. This post is one in a series that highlights a survey trend and the library’s response. We welcome your feedback anytime

Atlanta Library North 5th floor

Whenever the library solicits feedback from students, we can expect to get a ton of requests for more electrical outlets. The spring survey was no exception! You need more places to plug in and recharge your devices. We’ve been at work this summer to help you stay connected academically and personally. This month the Atlanta library added a total of 40 outlets to Library North floors 3, 4, and 5. See those black domes in the photos? Outlets! The Clarkston library added 13 outlets to its new seating area on the main level.

Clarkston Library wall outlets

Thanks to the library’s Facilities team for ensuring the success of these projects.

 

 

 

 

 


About the Author

Jennifer Jones is the Assessment & User Experience Librarian. She helps the library focus on continuous improvement through goal setting, evaluation, and user feedback.

Share
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (7 votes, average: 4.71 out of 5)
Loading...
Posted in For Students, General News | Leave a comment

Your University Library needs you.

Apply now to join the 2018-19 Student Library Advisory Council. The Student Library Advisory Council exists to provide the Atlanta Library with a student perspective on library services, resources, facilities, and policies.

What’s in it for you:

  • Gain leadership experience
  • Effect change
  • Engage with your campus

What the library needs from you:

  • A one-year commitment (with the opportunity to extend your service)
  • Attendance at one meeting per month during the academic year
  • Constructive feedback and creative ideas
  • Engagement with the library’s social media accounts
  • Willingness to serve as a library advocate

We invite Atlanta undergraduate and graduate students to apply now through September 4. Send your questions to Jennifer Jones.

 

About the Author

Jennifer Jones is the Assessment & User Experience Librarian. She helps the library focus on continuous improvement through goal setting, evaluation, and user feedback.

Share
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (4 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Still looking for a textbook or other course content?

textbook cover

Foundations of Health Information Technology by Chi Zhang and Robert Brown CCBY

Fall semester is just around the corner, so if you’re an instructor in search of a textbook or other course content, take a look at these resources which provide open textbooks. Unlike textbooks with all rights reserved copyright restrictions, open textbooks are freely available online and allow for copying, printing, and sharing. Many open textbooks also allow adaptation so that the content can be modified for individual instructional needs. Take a look at the license for each book to be sure what it allows.

Here are the top five places to find open textbooks:

Top 100 highest enrolled courses:  The highest enrolled courses in all of the University System of Georgia with links to currently used open textbooks and suggestions for which open textbook might work for you.

OER Metafinder: Developed by George Mason University, this tool currently searches 17 open content repositories simultaneously.

College Open Textbooks: Aggregates listings of open textbooks from across the web. Over 600 open textbooks sorted by discipline. Many of the textbooks include peer reviews.

OpenStax: Currently, there are only 44 textbooks in this collection, but they meet rigorous peer review requirements, scope and sequence requirements, and offer ancillary materials and affordable online homework options.

Open Textbook Library: (A Project of UMN) This library offers hundreds of open textbooks on a variety of subjects. You can read a review of the textbook and see the credentials/affiliation of the reviewer.

If you still don’t find what you are looking for, take a look at the GSU Library’s Open Education Guide. Or, contact Denise Dimsdale, Affordable Learning Georgia Library Coordinator, at the GSU Library. The GSU Library is happy to assist instructors with locating open resources, publishing open content, and locating course content and library resources that provide affordable options for students and pedagogical opportunities for instructors.

Share
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...
Posted in For Faculty, Instruction, Services, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

RFP: Textbook Transformation Grants, Fall 2018-19-Due September 10

GSU Open Textbook Cover

An example of a GSU open textbook: https://oer.galileo.usg.edu/english-textbooks/14/

Adopt, adapt, or create an open or affordable textbook alternative with an Affordable Learning Georgia (ALG) grant. Learn more at the Request for Proposals for Textbook Transformation Grants. This RFP is for Round 12, and applications are due by September 10, 2018. Projects have a maximum Final Semester of Fall 2019.

To apply:

  1. Read the Request for Proposals Document.
  2. Read the new 2018 Rubric for Peer Review.
  3. Fill out the Word version of the Application Form and keep this form for your records.
  4. Fill out the Online Application Form.

The Online Application Form is still in development, but will contain the same content as the Word version of the form and will be located on the Round Twelve RFP Page. Return to this page to view the completed Online Application Form when announced in the newsletter.

Webinars will be held for a general introduction to the application process and Q&A:

YouTube Archive: July 23, 2018, 2:00pm
Next information session: August 7, 2018, 2:00pm

The Georgia State University Library provides assistance with the grant process and with locating course content to fulfill grant requirements. Additionally, the GSU library coordinates with the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning for related pedagogical and instructional technology needs. For additional information or assistance, please contact Denise Dimsdale, ALG Library Coordinator or Laura Carruth, ALG Campus Champion.

Share
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (3 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...
Posted in For Faculty, Instruction, Services, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

UCL Press: An Open Access University Press

Book cover: Treasures from UCL

This book is published under a CC BY-NC-SA license. Front image: The Trevelyon manuscript; the Tudor rose, prominently featured (fol. 53r).

Reclaiming its license from commercial publishers, the University College London (UCL) Press, began operations under UCL’s Library Services in 2015 as “the first fully Open Access University Press in the UK”. The new vision and mission of the press includes using innovative technologies and ideas to establish open access as the primary scholarly publishing practice across disciplines. Most UCL Press journals are licensed with a CC-BY license. Books are licensed with a Creative Commons license chosen by the author. UCL Press’ commitment to open provides for a greater global reach for its content. The press’ use of flexible licensing options make way for innovative pedagogies and other creative scholarship that may not be possible with all rights reserved content.

In keeping with traditional quality measures, everything published through UCL Press is peer-reviewed. Although the press publishes a variety of formats, there is a focus on monographs with UCL Press publishing over 80 books in the past three years.

Explore a few UCL Press publications below:

Books:

Textbooks:

Or browse all eight UCL Press journals here.

For authors who want to publish open content through UCL Press, faculty, students, and other members of the UCL community publish for free. Authors who are not from UCL, are charged APCs (article processing charges) when applicable and BPCs (Book processing charges). However, waivers for BPCs are available for non-funded authors. Find out more about publishing through UCL Press here.

If you’d like to publish open content or if you’d like to use open content and don’t find what you need through UCL Press, there are many other options available. Take a look at the GSU Library’s Open Education Guide. Or, contact Denise Dimsdale, Affordable Learning Georgia Library Coordinator, at the GSU Library. The GSU Library is happy to assist instructors with locating open resources, publishing open content, and locating course content and library resources that provide affordable options for students and pedagogical opportunities for instructors.

Share
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...
Posted in Books, Ejournals, Faculty Publications and Research, For Faculty, For Graduate Students, Subject Areas | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Open Library for the Humanities

Becky Chilcott. The Constructivist Poster: https://www.openlibhums.org/site/academics/poster-series/

Although the Open Library for the Humanities (OLH) was launched only two years ago, their responsiveness to the specific needs of Humanities researchers provides a promising foundation for the creation and sustainability of high-quality open content for the field. Currently, the platform hosts 23 open journals for all to use. OLH’s business model eliminates author imposed Article Process Charges (APC) in favor of a consortium based business model. There’s no requirement for authors or their institutions to be or become consortium members in order to publish on OLH. Journals on OLH are by default licensed with a CCBY (Creative Commons-Attribution) license, but authors have the option to add a more restrictive license if they choose. Creative Commons licenses provide flexibility for activities such as the creation of course packs, online pedagogy and digital humanities projects.

Works on OLH are:

  • Fulfilling current submission criteria for the UK’s Research Excellence Framework
  • Rigorously peer review
  • Assigned a DOI for improved indexing/findability
  • Open: Freely available for users and free for authors to publish
  • Archived with sustainable archiving processes

See all 23 journals or explore a few here:

OLH also curates special collections of articles in the OLH journal such as:

You might use OLH if you’d like to find open content for your course or your Digital Humanities project. You might also use OLH if you’d like to publish on a rigorous open platform without having to pay article process charges. If you don’t find what you are looking for on OLH, take a look at the GSU Library’s Open Education Guide. Or, contact Denise Dimsdale, Affordable Learning Georgia Library Coordinator, at the GSU Library. The GSU Library is happy to assist instructors with locating open resources, publishing open content, and locating course content and library resources that provide affordable options for students and pedagogical opportunities for instructors.

Share
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (3 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...
Posted in Applied Linguistics and ESL, Art & Design, Digital Collections, Education, Ejournals, English, Film & Media, For Faculty, Global Studies, History, Instruction, Philosophy, Primary Resources, Publications and Research, Religious Studies | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

ZoteroBib for creating bibliographies quickly and easily

Lots of researchers love the easy, powerful, and free reference manager Zotero.

You can take advantage of many of the great features of Zotero with their new web-based bibliography creator, ZoteroBib. You don’t have to install any software, there are no ads, and it’s free.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Go to ZoteroBib at zbib.org.
  2. Enter a title, URL, ISBN, or other identifier for the source you’re citing.
  3. When you’re done entering sources, select the citation style you need (over 9000 styles available) and copy your bibliography to paste into your document.
  4. Don’t forget to double-check with your style manual – watch for capitalization and punctuation errors in particular.

Why should you use ZoteroBib instead of the Zotero, EndNote or Mendeley desktop applications?

  • Because you can’t or don’t want to install any software
  • You just need to create a quick bibliography without learning a new program
  • You don’t need to save or organize your sources for later projects

Why should you use Zotero, EndNote or Mendeley instead of ZoteroBib?

  • Saving and organizing sources in a personal library for long-term reference
  • Adding citations/footnotes into your Word document as you write
  • Adding your own notes, saving PDFs and other attachments
  • Synchronizing your personal library in the cloud and across multiple computers

Ask one of your GSU librarians for help and advice. For more info:

Share
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (3 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...
Posted in For Faculty, For Graduate Students, For Students, Software | Tagged , , | Leave a comment